Wood Worker’s Journal Features Berea’s Craft Expansion Through New Pine Croft School


Berea student working with woodcraft

Pine Croft, a woodworking school for adults, has been added to the repertoire of the Berea College Crafts Program and extends Berea’s support to the local, regional and national crafts communities. Located just minutes from campus and adjacent to the Berea College Forest, the woodworking school is on the site of the former Kelly Mehler’s School of Woodworking, which has been renamed The Woodworking School at Pine Croft.

Andy Glenn, Berea’s woodcraft supervisor, will manage the new program at Pine Croft. Glenn explains that the name “Pine Croft” was originally given to the property by Mrs. Anna Ernberg, the weaving director of Fireside Industries, when she made her home on the site in the early 1900s. The new woodworking school will continue the tradition of fine woodworking for which both the College and Kelly Melher are well known.

The Woodworking School at Pine Croft will offer two courses this summer, both of which will focus on production of Shaker-influenced furniture. The first session in July will be taught by Kelly Mehler. Andy Glenn will teach the second workshop. Register for the Summer 2019 sessions here.

Read the full article in Wood Worker’s Journal here.

Categories: News, Places, Programs and Initiatives
Tags: Woodcraft, Woodworking Crafts, Woodworking School at Pine Croft

Berea College, the first interracial and coeducational college in the South, focuses on learning, labor and service. The College admits only academically promising students with limited financial resources, primarily from Kentucky and Appalachia, although students come from 40 states and 70 countries. Every Berea student receives a Tuition Promise Scholarship, which means no Berea student pays for tuition. Berea is one of nine federally-recognized Work Colleges, so students work 10 hours or more weekly, earning money for books, housing and meals. The College’s motto, “God has made of one blood all peoples of the earth,” speaks to its inclusive Christian character.