Diverse Magazine Features the Father of Black History


Berea College and the Father of Black History by LaMont Jones Jr.

Preeminent scholar Dr. Carter G. Woodson has been dubbed “the father of Black history” and is known for earning degrees at the University of Chicago and Harvard, but less well known is how living in Appalachia and attending Berea College informed his towering intellect and tireless work ethic. Diverse Issues in Higher Education magazine writer LaMont Jones Jr. visited Berea’s campus to learn more about this alumnus who changed the way America views Black history. Hear from Alicestyne Turley, Berea’s director of the Carter G. Woodson Center, about how Woodson’s Appalachian roots and time at Berea impacted his life and how Berea College is keeping Woodson’s legacy alive today. Read the full article here. Alternatively, you may view the print version of the article here (PDF).

Categories: News, People, Places
Tags: Black History, Black History Month, Carter G. Woodson, Diverse Issues in Higher Education, Diverse Magazine, Dr. Alicestyne Turley, Father of Black History

Berea College, the first interracial and coeducational college in the South, focuses on learning, labor and service. The College only admits academically promising students with limited financial resources—primarily from Kentucky and Appalachia—but welcomes students from 40 states and 70 countries. Every Berea student receives a Tuition Promise Scholarship, which means no Berea student pays for tuition. Berea is one of nine federally recognized Work Colleges, so students work 10 hours or more weekly to earn money for books, housing and meals. The College’s motto, “God has made of one blood all peoples of the earth,” speaks to its inclusive Christian character.