bell hooks Honored in New York Times Column


bell hooks speaking at a podium

bell hooks speaking during the formal presentation of her papers to Berea College on April 10, 2017.
(Photo: Bethany Posey ’18)

bell hooks, Distinguished Professor in Residence in Appalachian Studies, was recently highlighted in a New York Times column by award-winning novelist and former student, Min Jin Lee. In the article, Lee looks back on her time as a student at Yale University in hooks’ “Introduction to African-American Literature” class. The writer reflects on how hooks’ writing helped shape the perception Lee initially had of her place in the feminist movement as a Korean woman.

While hooks didn’t assign her own literature, Lee explains that she and her friends sought out their assistant professor’s first book, “Ain’t I A Woman: Black Women and Feminism,” anyway. Initially, Lee expected she wouldn’t have a place in other prominent activists’ vision of feminist liberation. hooks’ work changed all of that. “For me, reading ‘Ain’t I A Woman,’ was as if someone had opened the door, the windows, and raised the roof in my mind,” Lee says.

Read Lee’s full article, “In Praise of bell hooks,” here.

Categories: News, People
Tags: bell hooks, faculty, Feminism, New York Times, women's history, Women’s History Month

Berea College, the first interracial and coeducational college in the South, focuses on learning, labor and service. The College only admits academically promising students with limited financial resources—primarily from Kentucky and Appalachia—but welcomes students from 40 states and 70 countries. Every Berea student receives a Tuition Promise Scholarship, which means no Berea student pays for tuition. Berea is one of nine federally recognized Work Colleges, so students work 10 hours or more weekly to earn money for books, housing and meals. The College’s motto, “God has made of one blood all peoples of the earth,” speaks to its inclusive Christian character.