Berea College Professor Publishes Book Exploring New Facet of African American History

Dwayne Mack

Dr. Dwayne Mack, Carter G. Woodson chair in African American History

Dwayne A. Mack, the Carter G. Woodson chair in African American History at Berea College, has collaborated on a newly published book Freedom’s Racial Frontier: African Americans in the Twentieth-Century West along with Herbert G. Ruffin II.

Between 1940 and 2010, the black population of the American West grew from 710,400 to 7 million. That growth has prompted a burgeoning interest in the history of the African American West—reflected in the remarkable range and depth of the works collected in Freedom’s Racial Frontier. Editors Ruffin  and Mack have gathered established and emerging scholars in the field to create an anthology linking past, current and future generations of African American West scholarship. Continue reading Berea College Professor Publishes Book Exploring New Facet of African American History

Making an Impact with Black History

This week we feature two African American staff/faculty members―Carl Thomas and Dr. Alicestyne Turley―whose work and personal influence is having a significant impact on Berea College students. Like others on campus and beyond, they are “investing in lives of great promise.” Continue reading Making an Impact with Black History

Bereans Still Making Black History

From Berea’s earliest days, African Americans have been central to the history of Berea College and the wider world. In this last installment of features for Black History Month 2016, we feature a diverse group of Berea College alumni who, each in their own way, continue to make Black History. Continue reading Bereans Still Making Black History

The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia Features Berea

Berea College has demonstrated its commitment to social and educational equality among the races since 1855, when it was founded and became the first interracial and coeducational college in the South. Now, three Berea College alumni, Jackie Burnside, Andrew Baskin, and Karen McDaniel, have been centrally involved in The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia, which is scheduled for publication later this month. Both Burnside and Baskin, who are members of the Berea College teaching faculty, wrote portions of the book and served on the advisory committee. McDaniel, who is Professor Emeritus at Kentucky State University and currently is a Visiting Scholar in African/African American Studies at Eastern Kentucky University, was an editor of the book, which prominently features Berea College. An article (see below) about The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia was published in the most recent issue of the Berea Citizen newspaper. Continue reading The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia Features Berea

Linda Strong-Leek: An Indelible Passion for Teaching

Originally posted on October 27, 2011 by Erica Cook ’13

 

“The students are the best thing about teaching at Berea College,” says Linda Strong-Leek, Ph.D., Berea College professor and administrator. “I love seeing those changes, those light bulb moments when a student gets it.” Continue reading Linda Strong-Leek: An Indelible Passion for Teaching

Berea College Plans Carter G. Woodson Center for Interracial Education

Honoring Berea alumnus Carter G. Woodson, the “Father of Black History,” the Berea College board of trustees has approved the creation of the Carter G. Woodson Center for Interracial Education that integrates the college’s Black Cultural Center and the African and African-American studies program. Continue reading Berea College Plans Carter G. Woodson Center for Interracial Education

Story of “The Clinton 12,” black teens who were first to integrate a public school in the South in 1956, told by members Bobby Cain and Gail Epps Upton and in award-winning documentary, at Berea College Jan. 18

Cain and Upton will also be awarded Berea College President’s Medallion

Bobby Cain and Gail Epps Upton were among a group of 12 black teenagers who in the fall of 1956 integrated the first public high school in the South, in Clinton, Tennessee, following the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Brown vs. Board of Education that effectively ended legal racial segregation in the nation’s public schools. Cain and Upton will talk about the experience in conjunction with the showing of “The Clinton 12,” an award-winning documentary produced in 2007 about this dramatic and historic event that remained untold for 50 years. In 1957, Bobby Cain became the first African American male to graduate from an integrated public high school in the South, and a year later, Upton became the first female graduate of an integrated high school in Tennessee. In addition to their reflections on a segregated past, the two will also share their hopes for a reconciled future. Continue reading Story of “The Clinton 12,” black teens who were first to integrate a public school in the South in 1956, told by members Bobby Cain and Gail Epps Upton and in award-winning documentary, at Berea College Jan. 18