Dr. Jason Strange

Assistant Professor of General Studies and Peace & Social Justice studies;
Chair of the Peace and Social Justice Studies Department
At Berea College since 2008

Contact Information

Draper Building, 102A
CPO 1956
Email: strangej@berea.edu
Phone: 859-985-3331

Fall 2017

Office Hours

Tuesday and Thursday 1:00pm – 3:00pm
and by appointment

Dr. Jason Strange
Jason tasting a cholla cactus in Joshua Tree National Park.

Class Schedule

  • PSJ 100 (Tue/Thur: 10:00 am – 11:50 am)
  • PSJ 450 (Mon/Wed/Fri: 8:00 am – 9:10 am)

About

Jason has lived in many different places, including a beautiful holler in eastern Kentucky, the Yurok Reservation in northern California, and the city of Oaxaca, Mexico. He recently finished a doctoral dissertation in Geography at UC Berkeley, which he hopes to turn into a book on back-to-the-land movements in the area around Berea. He enjoys many things, but especially writing, trail running, and hanging out with his young boy, Finn.

Degrees

  • B.S. Biology, Eastern Kentucky University, 2000
  • M.A. Geography, University of Kentucky, 2003
  • Ph.D. Geography, University of California, Berkeley, 2013

Selected Fellowships and Honors

  • 2014: Voted “Funniest Professor” by Berea College students.2012: Profiled in an article about the travel course SENS 125: Humans and Nature in the American West, in the Fall issue of Berea College Magazine (add link).2009: UC Berkeley Chancellor’s Dissertation Year Fellowship (one of twelve recipients for the entire Graduate Division), $30,000.
  • 2008: University of California Labor and Employment Research Fund Dissertation Fellowship, $30,000.
  • 2007: National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant, $10,000.
  • 2006: UC Berkeley Dean’s Normative Time Fellowship, $27,000.
  • 2001-05: National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, $102,000 over three years.
  • 2000: Kentucky Opportunity Fellowship, University of Kentucky, $28,000.
  • 2000: Daniel R. Reedy Quality Achievement Award, University of Kentucky, $9,600.
  • 1991: Associated Writing Programs National Poetry Award, for the poem “Voice Lessons,” published in Willow Springs.
  • 1990: Jodi Stutz Creative Writing Award, for the short story “The Midnight Time,” published in Toyon.

Publications and Presentations

  • Strange, J. (under revision). “Unearthing the back-to-the-land movement,” The Sixties. Strange, J. (in preparation). “Leaving the land: primitive accumulation, labor, and the transition to capitalism in eastern Kentucky.” For submission to The Journal of Appalachian Studies. Strange, J. (in preparation). “‘I don’t want to stay in a factory my whole life’: contemporary homesteading as labor resistance.” For submission to Geoforum.
  • Strange, J. (2013). Seeking Higher Ground: Contemporary Back-to-the-Land Movements in Eastern Kentucky. (Doctoral dissertation). UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.
  • Strange, J. (2013). “Voluntary enclosure and the transition to capitalism in Appalachian Kentucky.” Association of American Geographers, Los Angeles.
  • Strange, J. (2013). Invited panel discussant, “Doing more with less I: strategies for teaching geography with shrinking and shifting resources.” Association of American Geographers, Los Angeles.
  • Strange, J. (2013). Session co-organizer and discussant, “The rise, decline, (and rise again?) of the middle classes.” Association of American Geographers, Los Angeles.
  • Strange, J. (2013). “The multiple meanings of nature among contemporary homesteaders in Appalachia.” Dimensions of Political Ecology, Lexington, Kentucky.
  • Strange, J. (2013). “Hicks, hippies, and the back-to-the-land movement.” Appalachian Studies Conference, Boone, North Carolina.
  • Strange, J. (2012). “A conflation of Karls: the unfortunate jumbling of Marx and Polanyi in the concept of neoliberalism.” Dimensions of Political Ecology, Lexington, Kentucky.
  • Strange, J. (2012). “Unearthing the back-to-the-land movement in Eastern Kentucky.” Association of American Geographers, New York.
  • Strange, J. (2011). “Contemporary Appalachian homesteading as a form of labor resistance.” Dimensions of Political Ecology, Lexington, Kentucky.
  • Strange, J. (2007). Invited panel discussant, “Appalachian folkways as sustainability education.” Campus-Community Partnerships for Sustainability, Richmond, Kentucky.
  • Strange, J. (2002). “Hidden by the shade: the construction and marketing of the small coffee farmer.” Association of American Geographers, Los Angeles.