Students Attend Presidential Inauguration


Published originally in the Spring 2009 edition of the Berea College Magazine

“The inauguration of Barack Obama was a historical moment for our nation that Berea’s founders could not have imagine—but one they certainly wold have embraced. In some ways, it was a fulfillment of Berea’s interracial mission and history—and we are witnesses to that moment,” said President Shinn.

Several Berea students and faculty members traveled to Washington D.C. to witness in person Berea’s interracial commitment being fulfilled. Black Cultural Center director, Tashia Bradley, along with Keith Bullock of Facilities Management, and faculty members Kathy Bullock (music) and Linda Strong-Leek (women’s studies) helped coordinate the transportation of 54 students to Washington D.C. by bus.

Students who attended were of various ages, ethnicities and national origins. The group boarded and departed the evening of January 19 and arrived in Washington about 5:30 a.m. on January 20. They waited in the bitter cold with millions of others for the inauguration of President Barack Obama. Attendee Stephanie Browner, Dean of the Faculty, also was celebrating the appointment of her sister, Carol Browner, as Assistant to the President for Energy and climate Change

Categories: News, People, Places
Tags: Barack Obama, Commitment, inauguration, interracial education

Berea College, the first interracial and coeducational college in the South, focuses on learning, labor and service. The College only admits academically promising students with limited financial resources—primarily from Kentucky and Appalachia—but welcomes students from 40 states and 70 countries. Every Berea student receives a Tuition Promise Scholarship, which means no Berea student pays for tuition. Berea is one of nine federally recognized Work Colleges, so students work 10 hours or more weekly to earn money for books, housing and meals. The College’s motto, “God has made of one blood all peoples of the earth,” speaks to its inclusive Christian character.