Naomi Tutu Facilitates ‘Truth & Reconciliation,’ January 20


Naomi Tutu, daughter of Archbishop Desmond Tutu and a 1983 alumna of Berea College, will facilitate a workshop titled “Truth and Reconciliation” on January 20 from 5-7:30 p.m. in the Carter G. Woodson Center Gallery in the Alumni Building. Dinner is provided.

There is no cost for the event but a reservation is required and will be accommodated on a first-come, first-served basis. Please R.S.V.P. to Woodson Center Administrative Assistant, Diana Taylor at diana.taylor@berea.edu or 859-985-3785 if you plan to attend.

This workshop is intended for those who lead truth and reconciliation processes in their community. The focus is on dealing with how we listen to and speak truth to one another. The participants start by looking into the stories we have been told and that we tell ourselves about ourselves and “others.” Participants will spend time investigating the importance of those stories and the effect these messages play on our perceptions and actions.

Naomi Tutu started her public speaking as a college student at Berea College when she was invited to present at churches, community groups, colleges and universities about her experiences growing up in apartheid South Africa. Since that time, she has become a much sought-after speaker to groups as varied as business associations, professional conferences, elected officials, church and civic organizations.

Categories: News, Programs and Initiatives
Tags: Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Carter G. Woodson Center, Naomi Tutu, Truth and Reconciliation

Berea College, the first interracial and coeducational college in the South, focuses on learning, labor and service. The College only admits academically promising students with limited financial resources—primarily from Kentucky and Appalachia—but welcomes students from 40 states and 70 countries. Every Berea student receives a Tuition Promise Scholarship, which means no Berea student pays for tuition. Berea is one of nine federally recognized Work Colleges, so students work 10 hours or more weekly to earn money for books, housing and meals. The College’s motto, “God has made of one blood all peoples of the earth,” speaks to its inclusive Christian character.