“Conversating: Black Men Speak”


conversating: Black Men Speak

The bell hooks Institute at Berea College will be hosting events called “Conversating: Black Men Speak” on April 9, and April 11-13, 2016.

Acclaimed intellectual, feminist theorist, cultural critic, artist and writer bell hooks will hold conversations with the following guest speakers:

  • Cornel West, April 9
  • Darnell Moore, April 11
  • Kevin Powell, April 12
  • Oman Frame, April 13

Each “conversating” event will be at the bell hooks Institute, 300 Center Street, Berea, Kentucky, from 4:00-6:00 p.m. The events are free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.

hooks selected Berea College as the site for the bell hooks Institute, which documents her life and work. Born Gloria Jean Watkins in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, bell hooks adopted the pen name of her maternal great-grandmother, a woman known for speaking her mind. The Institute promotes ending domination through understanding the ways systems of exploitation and oppression intersect through critical thinking, teaching, events and conversation. The writings of bell hooks cover topics of gender, race, class, spirituality, teaching and the significance of media in contemporary culture. The Institute periodically brings together regional and national scholars and thinkers, such as Gloria Steinem, with local community members to study, learn and engage in critical dialogue.

For more information contact: bhi@berea.edu

Categories: News, Programs and Initiatives
Tags: bell hooks, conversating, Literature

Berea College, the first interracial and coeducational college in the South, focuses on learning, labor and service. The College admits only academically promising students with limited financial resources, primarily from Kentucky and Appalachia, although students come from 40 states and 70 countries. Every Berea student receives a Tuition Promise Scholarship, which means no Berea student pays for tuition. Berea is one of nine federally-recognized Work Colleges, so students work 10 hours or more weekly, earning money for books, housing and meals. The College’s motto, “God has made of one blood all peoples of the earth,” speaks to its inclusive Christian character.