Berea Dedicates “Deep Green” Residence Hall


The dedication ceremony of the new “Deep Green” residence hall, believed to be one of the world’s “greenest,” was held Friday, October 18.

Three years in the making, this 42,000 square foot, three-story facility with 66 rooms houses 120 students.

Deep Green is expected to achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) v2009 Platinum Certification by theU.S. Green Building Council and meet Petal Recognition under the Living Building Challenge 2.0 (LBC) by the International Living Future Institute. Pending these certifications, college officials expect this building to be recognized as one of the greenest in the world.

Oriented along an east-west axis to maximize sunlight into its interior and allow 114 photovoltaic panels to soak up as much direct sunlight as possible, Deep Green utilizes solar panel arrays, a geothermal heat pump system, high-efficiency windows, Energy Star rated appliances and low-flow plumbing fixtures. These energy-saving features earn all 19 points offered by the LEED Optimized Energy Performance Credits and result in 35% less energy usage than typical residence halls of the same size and savings of 55% in annual energy costs.

Energy usage intensity (EUI) is most often expressed in terms of annual energy used per square foot of building. Residence halls across the country, on average, measure an EUI of 90. Deep Green is designed to achieve an EUI of 32.

The construction methods, sustainability features and usage of local and recycled materials in construction of the residence hall fit within the college’s strategic direction to meet the American College & University President’s Climate Commitment goal of eliminating greenhouse gas emissions from campus operations and to promote sustainability to the campus, local community and region.

Categories: News, Places
Tags: Dedication, Deep Green, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

Berea College, the first interracial and coeducational college in the South, focuses on learning, labor and service. The College admits only academically promising students with limited financial resources, primarily from Kentucky and Appalachia, although students come from 40 states and 70 countries. Every Berea student receives a Tuition Promise Scholarship, which means no Berea student pays for tuition. Berea is one of nine federally-recognized Work Colleges, so students work 10 hours or more weekly, earning money for books, housing and meals. The College’s motto, “God has made of one blood all peoples of the earth,” speaks to its inclusive Christian character.