Berea College Faculty Member, Kate Egerton, Chosen to Participate in Selective Seminar on Ancient Greece

Katherine Egerton, Associate Professor and Program Chair of English at Berea College is one of a select group of faculty members nationwide chosen by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) and the Center for Hellenic Studies to participate in an Ancient Greece in the Modern Classroom seminar on “Song Culture of Athenian Drama.”

Dr. Kate Egerton

Dr. Kate Egerton

CIC and the Center for Hellenic Studies recently selected 19 faculty members from Colleges all across the U.S. to participate in “Song Culture of Athenian Drama,” which will take place July 20–26, 2015, at the Center for Hellenic Studies campus in Washington, DC.

“Strengthening the teaching of the classics at colleges and universities is of critical importance. This seminar series addresses the challenge of keeping alive in undergraduate education classical texts that a generation ago were read and understood by every college graduate,” said CIC President Richard Ekman. “We believe that Egerton will play a strong role in the seminar.”

The seminar will focus on the work of Euripides, a playwright from the fifth century BCE. Participants will explore the performative aspects of his plays and the ways he drew upon, adapted, and transformed a range of lyric traditions. Participants also will compare the choral song making of Euripides to the approaches of other contemporary composers of tragedy (and comedy) and situate it within the parallel forms of song making that survive from sixth century. Gregory Nagy, Francis Jones Professor of Classical Greek Literature and professor of comparative literature at Harvard University, and Kenneth Scott Morrell, associate professor of Greek and Roman studies at Rhodes College, will lead the seminar. The seminar is funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

For ten years, CIC has collaborated with the Center for Hellenic Studies to provide seminars on teaching the classics for small and mid-sized independent colleges that have a limited number of faculty members or courses in the classics. The seminar is ideal for faculty members who have been trained in other disciplines and who seek opportunities to explore major classical texts and learn new ways to teach these texts to undergraduates.

Berea, the first interracial and coeducational college in the South, focuses on learning, labor, and service. Berea charges no tuition, admitting only academically promising students with limited economic resources, primarily from Appalachia. All students must work 10 hours or more weekly, earning money for books, room and board. The College’s motto “God has made of one blood all peoples of the earth, (Acts 17:26)” speaks to its inclusive character, and the quality of its programs ensures that graduates from Berea go on to distinguish themselves and the College in many fields.

The Council of Independent Colleges is an association of 750 nonprofit independent colleges and universities and higher education affiliates and organizations that has worked since 1956 to support college and university leadership, advance institutional excellence, and enhance public understanding of private higher education’s contributions to society.

Harvard University’s Center for Hellenic Studies brings together a variety of research and teaching interests centering on Hellenic civilization in the widest sense of the term “Hellenic.” This concept encompasses the evolution of the Greek language and its culture as a central point of contact for all the different civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean world.

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