Daily COVID-19 Update: March 24, 2020


Dear Bereans,

This is the update for Tuesday, March 24, 2020.

Social distancing

Yesterday I mentioned my appreciation for Governor Beshear, and he said something in his daily press briefing yesterday that seemed worth passing along, “Social distancing does not mean social isolation.”  His point, of course, being that isolation is not good for any of us, so we should continue to communicate with our friends and family via social media and in-person if that’s possible.  He also stressed, regarding those in-person interactions, that we respect the advice of the CDC to maintain that six foot distance of separation.

An announcement from the Labor Program

The Labor Program office wanted me to remind everyone that student labor is still going on and classes are still in session.  I had been thinking that everyone knew that, but if I’m wrong, consider yourself reminded.

A Perspective on the COVID-19 Virus from the Department of Religion

By Jeff B. Pool, Chairperson, Department of Religion, Eli Lilly Chair in Religion and Culture, and Professor of Religion

Various religions and other spiritualities offer numerous explanations for the realities of illness, pain, suffering, and death, as well as ways in which to respond to those realities.  Because traditions in all religious and spiritual communities contain many diverse and sometimes even conflicting layers, some layers of traditions offer greater wisdom for life and its challenges than other layers.  Some representatives of theistic traditions have described viruses as “evil” and illnesses as “judgments” from God on specific groups of people for their “sins,” which then have produced corresponding judgments on those groups of people as the sources of the problems for which God purportedly has inflicted illness, suffering, and death on humanity at large.  Other representatives of the same theistic traditions, however, have interpreted such human health-crises differently: understanding viruses, as well as other natural threats to human life, as part of the larger world that God has created; describing illnesses and diseases as the natural interactive conflicts among creatures that endeavor in their own ways to survive and to propagate themselves (a tragic reality, understood as the conflict among various goods, rather than “evil” in opposition to the anthropocentrically-defined “supreme good” of human life); and, as a result, encouraging sharply different forms of human responses to such challenges to human life.

At their best, the diverse traditions of religious communities and other spiritual traditions regard such multi-dimensional health-crises for human life as genuine opportunities for both personal and social transformation.  For numerous spiritualities, such critical situations guide and encourage people both to discern that which they can control in order to work toward change and to release their attachments to that which they cannot control in order to consent to that which they cannot change.  Various layers of Christian, Buddhist, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim, Sikh, and many other spiritual traditions teach that such challenges to life offer possibilities for deepening human character, for either instilling or reinforcing important human virtues: gratitude for all that each person has received, understanding life itself as gift; trust in the meaningfulness of life, despite the challenges that inevitably arise; equanimity and peacefulness in the midst of turmoil and chaos; humilitycompassion for all creatures; an attitude of non-judgment toward other people; a passion for social justice and reciprocity in a profoundly interdependent world; generosity toward and hospitality for people in dire circumstances; and even joy in the experiences of both severe suffering and grief over losses that result from that suffering.

Many of the same religions and other spiritual traditions also develop practices through which to develop human character: meditative techniques, physical exercises, contemplation, and prayer, among many other methods.  For example, in the current global crisis, people might view very differently even the supposedly restrictive measures that various levels of society have prudently imposed on or recommended to communities and individuals in order to address this health-crisis.  Rather than construing such measures (“social-distancing,” sequestering, even meticulous “hand-washing”) as limitations on human freedoms or “rights,” people might understand the practice of such measures as practical exercises, even as rituals or prayers, to develop the virtues that will shape their character and that will enable them to contribute to changing the world as they now experience it.

(I particularly enjoyed Dr. Pool’s creative suggestion that we consider some of the good advice for taking care of ourselves during the COVID-19 crisis, as something like religious practice.)

Stay safe!

Lyle Roelofs, President