Berea College Ranked No. 1 “Best Value College” by The Wall Street Journal/THE

A Berea College student reading the Wall Street Journal's article ranking Berea College Number 1Berea College once again tops the list of “Best Value Colleges” in the nation in The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education (THE) 2021 College Rankings. Berea’s no-tuition model contributed to its No. 1 best-value ranking.

To determine the best value among the top 250 schools WSJ/THE divided each institution’s overall score by its net price, which includes the total cost of attending a school, such as tuition, fees, room and board, books and supplies, minus federal or institutional financial aid that doesn’t have to be repaid. Students who don’t receive any aid aren’t included in the calculation. The College ranked No. 144 overall, climbing from l55 last year.

(more…)

Categories: News, Places
Tags: Accolade, best-value private colleges, Times Higher Education, Wall Street Journal

Jennifer Bentz Awarded $8,500 Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship

Jennifer Bentz in front of University of St. Louis School of Medicine building

Jennifer Bentz, a Berea College alumna of Maryville, Tennessee, received a Fellowship worth $8,500 by The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi (PKP)—the nation’s oldest collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines. Bentz is one of 58 recipients nationwide to receive a Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship.

Bentz received a bachelor’s degree in biology from Berea College earlier this year. As a Phi Kappa Phi Fellow, Bentz will pursue a Doctor of Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

(more…)

Categories: News, People
Tags: alumni, Biology Department, Phi Kappa Phi

Berea Ranked No. 1 as Best Bang for the Buck and No. 3 Best Liberal Arts College

Washington Monthly 2020 College Rankings CoverWashington Monthly ranked Berea College No. 1 as the Best Bang for the Buck Colleges in the South. Berea also was named the nation’s No. 3 top liberal arts college in the 2020 Washington Monthly College Rankings guide. No other college in Kentucky was in the top 50. Such recognition for Berea comes from its success in educating and graduating academically talented, low-income students who become service-oriented leaders in their professions and communities. Last year, Berea held the No. 1 and No. 4 spots respectively.

Berea College was recognized by Washington Monthly author Robert Kelchen for maintaining “consistently high rankings thanks to their economic diversity, relatively strong graduation rates and commitment to meeting students’ financial need.”

(more…)

Categories: News, Places
Tags: Accolade, Washington Monthly

Berea College Seeks 1,600 Donors on Sept. 3

Giving Day Banner August 2019

Photo: Crystal Wylie ’05

Berea College is looking for 1,600 people to participate in its annual Giving Day on Thursday, Sept. 3. This event generates significant excitement and support for Berea’s students with contributions coming from donors locally, regionally and nationally.

Donors can support Berea’s Giving Day easily by making a gift online; by texting “BEREA” to 56512; by calling 800-457-9846; or by mailing a check to CPO 2216, Berea, KY 40404.

(more…)

Categories: News, Programs and Initiatives
Tags: Giving Day, Philanthropy, Student Philanthropy

Berea Named One of the Best 386 Colleges in the Princeton Review’s 2021 Guide

The Best 386 Colleges Princeton Review CoverThe Princeton Review has once again cited Berea College as “one of the nation’s best institutions for undergraduates to earn their college degree.” This citation was made in their just-released publication of The Best 386 Colleges: 2021 edition of the annual college guide.

Berea is nationally recognized for its high-quality education and its distinctive labor program, which hires every admitted student to help operate the school. Berea is also known for its Tuition Promise Scholarship that covers more than $44,000 in annual tuition costs for every student. Berea’s students mostly come from families making an average of $29,000 and are the first in their families to attend college.

(more…)

Categories: News, Places
Tags: Accolade, Princeton Review, tuition, Tuition-free

Berea College Named No. 1 Top Producer of Gilman Scholars 

2018-2019 Gilman Top ProducerContinuing a long tradition of students winning Gilman scholarships, Berea College was named the top U.S. college for having the most 2018-2019 Gilman International Scholarship undergraduates, 21, among colleges with enrollments under 5,000. Berea also was recognized in other categories, including top producers for first-generation students and top producer for most diverse destinations for studying abroad.

(more…)

Categories: News, Programs and Initiatives
Tags: Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship, Center for International Education, Gilman International Scholarship

Remembering Our Brother, Congressman John R. Lewis

Congressman John R. Lewis addresses the graduates, Commencement 2017

With the passing of Congressman John Lewis, our world has lost an extraordinary leader who dedicated his life to freedom, justice and equality for all. He is one of the last great soldiers of the Civil Rights Movement that helped change the lives of Black Americans. For Berea College, we have lost a dear friend and brother who embraced us as kin.

Congressman Lewis visited Berea several times. When Berea College in 2016 was invited by a U.S. House Ways and Means subcommittee to testify on the use of its endowment to support Berea’s no-tuition promise to students, Congressman Lewis was at that hearing and spoke to the Berea delegation afterward, suggesting that it had been some years—1990, in fact—since he had been to Berea College. “I would love to come back. Invite me,” he said.

Congressman John Lewis

Congressman John Lewis, Representative of Georgia’s Fifth District

So invite him the College did, to receive an honorary degree the following year at the 2017 Commencement. In his speech, he imparted his deep wisdom to our graduates about the world that lie before them and their duty to change it for the better. He encouraged all of us to continue to “make good trouble,” for it is the only way to fight for justice, equality and equity. John Lewis was just 25 years old when he marched from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama in 1965. He was among the protesters beaten by police, but he was undeterred in his fight for civil rights. He dedicated his life to that fight, making good trouble until his final days.

The Berea College community is deeply saddened by the passing of our brother and honorary alumnus—indeed, our teacher and mentor, Congressman John Lewis. His affection for Berea and its mission and his enduring legacy are stamped on our hearts for all time.

READ AN EXCERPT of Lewis’ interview with Berea College Media Relations Manager Tim Jordan, published in the Summer 2017 edition of the Berea College Magazine.

Categories: News
Tags:

Berea College Offers Test Score Optional Admissions

Berea College will now allow its prospective students to apply for admission without requiring standardized test scores.

Berea College joins more than 1,000 elite institutions like Harvard, Princeton, Stanford, and Notre Dame who are offering test score optional admissions to their fall 2021 class. The COVID-19 pandemic has created insurmountable barriers for standardized testing for students across the country, and especially for the students and families that Berea College serves.

(more…)

Categories: News, Programs and Initiatives
Tags: Admissions

Bill Daugherty Begins Term as Berea College Trustee

Bill Daugherty profileWilliam S. (Bill) Daugherty was elected in April to serve on the Berea College Board of Trustees for a term beginning July 1.

A 1976 Berea College alumnus and recipient of Berea’s 2017 Distinguished Alumnus Award, Daugherty is a co-founder and serves as a Managing Partner of BlackRidge Resource Partners LLC, an independent exploration and production company with oil and gas production in Kentucky, Illinois, Texas, Oklahoma and Wyoming.

“As an alumnus, I have always been grateful for the opportunities Berea College afforded me and the solid foundation I received for my future,” said Daugherty.  “I look forward to giving back by serving as a contributing member of the Board of Trustees.”

(more…)

Categories: News, People
Tags: Bill Daugherty, Board of Trustees, distinguished alumnus award, trustee

Statement on Supreme Court Ruling Protecting LGBTQ+ Members in the Workplace

Drone photo over campus with a rainbow in the background

We are heartened by the recent Supreme Court ruling that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects members of the LGBTQ+ community from discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation and gender identity. At Berea College, we are guided by the motto, “God has made of one blood all peoples of the earth.” That all-encompassing scripture from Acts 17:26 implies that we are all equal, giving no consideration to race, gender, ethnicity, economic status, religion or sexual orientation. The Court’s ruling affirms our commitment to employees and provides another level of security in the workplace. June is Pride Month, and yesterday, June 28, was the 50th anniversary of the first Pride march, held on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. We, indeed, are of one blood.

Categories: News, Places
Tags: Civil Rights, Human rights, lgbtq, Mission

Berea College Announces Plan for Fall Semester; All Students Invited to Return to Campus

The Administrative Committee of Berea College has decided to invite all Berea students to return for the upcoming semester. The fall 2020 semester will begin on Aug. 12 and conclude Nov. 24, prior to Thanksgiving.

The Administrative Committee carefully reviewed input from various College groups, including the Division Council, logistics groups and the Fall Re-opening Task Force, as well as information from various agencies regarding the situation of the COVID-19 pandemic nationally, statewide and locally to inform its decision.

(more…)

Categories: News, Places
Tags: coronavirus, covid-19, fall 2020

An important announcement from President Lyle Roelofs regarding the Fall 2020 semester

We’re excited to invite all Berea College students to return to campus this fall. Adhering to our Great Commitments, we aim to create a democratic community, allowing students to make the best decision for themselves about whether to return to campus during this challenging time. Hear more from President Lyle Roelofs and see some key takeaways below.

  • The Fall 2020 semester will begin on August 12 and will conclude prior to Thanksgiving.
  • Students will have three choices: to return to campus, continue distance learning or defer their semester (we will share more details as further decisions are finalized).
  • We will be operating with heightened sensitivity to healthy behaviors that everyone on campus must strictly follow.
Categories: News, Places
Tags: coronavirus, covid-19, fall 2020

Black Lives Matter

March on Selma

Berea College stands in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement and those peacefully demonstrating against police brutality across the country and around the world. Our founding in 1855 by radical abolitionists, the Reverend John G. and Matilda Fee, as the first interracial and coeducational college in the slaveholding South underscores our unwavering commitment to equality and equity. Black lives mattered to Rev. Fee and the early founders of Berea. When the Kentucky legislature passed the Day Law in 1904, prohibiting integration in schools, Berea College took the fight all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court because Black people would have had few educational opportunities in Kentucky without Berea College. The Court ruled against Berea College, and it was forcibly segregated in 1908. The College’s trustees raised money and redirected funds to establish Lincoln Institute in 1912 for Black students displaced from the College.

Carter G. Woodson

Carter G. Woodson

Stripped of its founding mission for over four decades, the College struggled throughout the Jim Crow era to reclaim an interracial heritage that includes such notable African American graduates as Carter G. Woodson – known as the father of Black history; Julia Britton Hooks, a teacher, suffragist in the fight for women’s rights, and the grandmother of former NAACP executive director Benjamin Hooks; and James Bond, the grandfather of civil rights activist Julian Bond. Grounded in a history of activism, Berea College demonstrated its commitment to human rights through its participation in the monumental March on Frankfort, Ky., in 1964 and the Selma to Montgomery March in 1965. Our involvement in that phase of the Black Freedom Struggle contributed to African American students founding the Black Student Union and the Black Ensemble (now called the Black Music Ensemble) in the late 1960s, and the institution establishing Black Studies in the early 1970s. In the post Civil Rights era, Berea continued its commitment to Black lives, opening the Black Cultural Center in the early 1980s and the Carter G. Woodson Center in 2012.

Throughout the past 40 years, dedicated efforts to recruit, enroll and retain a diverse student population, combined with increased hiring of African Americans in faculty and staff positions, have resulted in a campus community where nearly half of the students identify as people of color.

Still… we can and must do more. This moment calls for our support. Our history demands it.

Black Lives Matter Demonstration in Berea, KY

Protesters gather for Black Lives Matter Demonstration in Berea, KY in front of Boone Tavern on May 31, 2020.

In the era of Black Lives Matter, we’re working to ensure Berea College continues to fulfill its mission to educate blacks and whites together, living up to its motto: God has made of one blood all peoples of the earth (Acts 17:26). We reaffirm our commitment to interracial education, diversity, equity and inclusion, and dismantling white supremacy and systemic racism. Berea College commits to the following:

  1. Increase our efforts in recruitment, enrollment and retention of African American students from Appalachia and urban areas within our enrollment territory.
  2. Create an endowment to support the Carter G. Woodson Center for Interracial Education and the programs it offers.
  3. Establish an endowed professorship in interracial education responsible for creating a curriculum in interracial education that has a particular emphasis on understanding and equality among all peoples.
  4. Continue to support dialogue on race and education in a bi-annual symposium. The Carter G. Woodson Center for Interracial Education would collaborate with the Black Cultural Center, Student Life and the African and African Studies department to host the event, which will feature discussions on issues of diversity, equity and inclusion in America and what the College and the community can do to dismantle white supremacy and systemic racism.
  5. Endow the Civil Rights Tour, hosted by the Carter G. Woodson Center, as an educational program that explores important locations involved in the Civil Rights movement in the American South.
  6. Introduce courses in Native American Studies into the Berea College curriculum to educate students about the history of indigenous people in Kentucky and throughout Appalachia.
  7. Continue to support educational initiatives through the office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. In one such initiative, the College will explore ways to formally recognize, celebrate and educate Bereans about the Juneteenth commemoration.

Berea College is guided by eight Great Commitments, among them one that asserts the kinship of all people. Standing in solidarity with Black Lives Matter, the College strives to uphold its commitment to creating an equitable educational community that welcomes, supports and values all members. We invite institutions of higher learning throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the South to join us in our support of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Categories: News
Tags:

As ‘Working College,’ Berea Provides High Quality at No Cost

Originally posted by Kentucky Ag Connection

Student loan debt in the United States is no joke. The total amount of debt has tripled since 2005 with college graduates and former students owing a jaw-dropping $1.6 trillion. Student loan debt is only surpassed by mortgage debt in the U.S.

The debt burden today’s college grads are carrying is actually changing the way millennials live their lives when compared to previous generations. Some have delayed marriage, put off buying a home, and even foregone having children due to their student loan burdens.

(more…)

Categories: News, Places
Tags: Labor Program, Mission, Student debt, tuition, Work College

As a ‘Working College,’ Berea College Provides High-Quality Education to Low-Income Students at No Cost

Guest post by Matt Walker, credit strategist and contributing editor to badcredit.org

Student loan debt in the United States is no joke. The total amount of debt has tripled since 2005 with college graduates and former students owing a jaw-dropping $1.6 trillion. Student loan debt is only surpassed by mortgage debt in the U.S.

The debt burden today’s college grads are carrying is actually changing the way millennials live their lives when compared to previous generations. Some have delayed marriage, put off buying a home, and even foregone having children due to their student loan burdens.

The student loan crisis recently gained a bit more attention on the national stage as COVID-19 has spread across the country. Social distancing and shelter-at-home orders have left millions out of work. Thankfully, Congress was able to quickly come together to pass the CARES Act, which halted student loan payments for six months and also paused collections on overdue student loan payments.

But after the COVID-19 crisis ends, the student loan debt crisis will remain.

What if students didn’t have to pay tuition to receive a high-quality college education? What if they went out into the world after four years debt-free and ready to contribute to society?

That’s what’s happening at Berea College in Berea, Kentucky. The private college uses its endowment to accept academically promising, low-income students who likely would not have any other way to pursue higher education. And as part of their tuition-free education, students work 10 hours or more per week for the college in some capacity.

As the college itself puts it, it’s the best education money can’t buy.

We recently spoke with Berea College’s President Dr. Lyle Roelofs about the institution’s history and differentiating approach to higher education.

An Institution Founded on Progressive Ideals in the Pre-Civil War Era

“The college actually goes back to just before the Civil War,” Roelofs said. “It was founded by an abolitionist. Early on, it wasn’t completely free but it was always interracial and co-educational from the start.”

Berea College was the vision of Rev. John G. Fee, who started the institution as a one-room school in the central Kentucky town in 1855.

Berea was the first interracial and co-educational college to be founded in the South.“Fee, a native of Bracken County, Ky., was a scholar of strong moral character, dedication, determination, and great faith,” according to the college website. “He believed in a school that would be an advocate of equality and excellence in education for men and women of all races.”

Like so many businesses and institutions in the south, the college shuttered its doors during the Civil War but reopened as a bigger and better institution shortly after the war ended. The college made its next big step toward the model it operates on today with the tenure of its third president, who made some big changes.

“One was to eliminate tuition and another was to provide on-campus jobs for every student,” Roelofs said. “The idea was that those two things would enable students — instead of going away, working for a semester, coming back, then going away, and coming back — they might be able just to go right through and get their degree.”

To replace the cost of tuition, the college began a fundraising campaign aimed at wealthy people, mostly in the Northeast, who were willing to support schools in the South during the Reconstruction Era, Roelofs said.

“That was successful. (The president) promoted our service to Appalachia,” Roelofs said. “The idea was, as he put it, ‘to educate those undiscovered Abraham Lincolns that are still in the mountains and would otherwise not have access because they just don’t have any money.”

In the 1920s, the college established an endowment to move away from a model of only fundraising.

These early visionary and progressive efforts laid the foundation for the successful institution that Berea College is today.

How the Working College Model Functions and Allows Students to Attend Tuition-Free

Roelofs said Berea College’s endowment has now grown to a point that on a per-student basis it is comparable to some of the most highly ranked colleges in the country, and so is able to support a very high-quality educational experience.

“Until the recent downturn, it was about $750,000 per student,” he said. “That spins off about $35,000 to $40,000 per student per year. And that’s the foundation for the business model. We also raise another $4 million from donors annually. And we get a lot of Pell support because we don’t take students unless they have high need.”

Besides accepting no tuition, one of Berea College’s other main distinctions is that it is one of only nine federally recognized Working Colleges in the U.S.Roelofs explained that if a student can afford to pay any tuition at all, his or her application will not be accepted at Berea College. The mean family income of the college’s first-year students is less than $30,000 per year.

At Berea, every student works 10 to 15 hours per week while carrying a full academic load. The students are able to choose work options in more than 100 college and off-campus programs.

“Students gain valuable workplace experience, earn money for books, food and other expenses, and their appreciation for the dignity and utility of labor is enhanced,” according to the Berea College website.

And there is plenty of work to go around.

“The students are such good workers that every department around here wants more students,” Roelofs said. “The jobs are there — we’re always short on students to fill every job.”

The big upside for Berea College students is that they can graduate from college debt-free, unlike students from so many other institutions in the U.S.

Roelofs said that about one-third of Berea College students don’t incur any debt at all. Other students may incur small debts if they want to study abroad for a semester or perhaps they have family members they help care for.

But for those two-thirds, the average debt upon graduation is a meager $6,700. Not bad, considering the average college graduate in 2017 left school with an average debt of $28,650.

An Academic Curriculum That Sets Students Up to Succeed and Share Their Success

Although Berea College’s business model as a Working College is much different than most higher education institutions, it still offers a high-caliber education in an array of degree programs.

Students can earn a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree in one of 32 different majors or choose alternative options such as student-designed majors or a dual-degree engineering program. Berea also houses 16 national and international honor societies.

“Berea’s educational experience provides students the knowledge and skills to successfully navigate the world,” according to the college website. “Berea provides a stimulating and challenging environment. Whether in the classroom, attending a Convocation, interning, studying abroad or linking labor with academic goals, the educational experience is truly like no other.”

Roelofs praised the students’ work ethic, saying they don’t take their education opportunity for granted. About 70% of Berea College students are from the Appalachian region, but overall, there are 1,600 undergraduate students representing nearly every U.S. state and more than 60 countries. And 1 out of 3 students is a person of color, according to the college.

“Berea students are much more aware that this is probably their best and only chance to get a college degree,” he said. “It’s not like, ‘If this doesn’t work out for me, Mom and Dad will let me transfer to another school, and they’ll continue to pay tuition.’ If you don’t make it at Berea, you probably don’t have other good options. Maybe you go into the military or to a community college and see how that goes.”

Additionally, the student body is less cynical than it may be at other schools, Roelofs said.

And with Berea College graduates entering the workforce with little to no debt, they are free to make positive impacts on society and help their families in ways that may not have otherwise been possible.

“When you change the economic trajectory of a student’s life you actually change many trajectories,” Roelofs said. “That student will go on to have a family, and that family will be in completely different circumstances than they otherwise would have.”

This also means the student can help his or her other family members, such as parents, brothers, sisters, and cousins as well.

“So the impact of changing one life is really much, much broader than that one life,” he said.

Berea College has seen its graduates go on to an array of successful careers. One graduate won the Nobel Prize, Roelofs said, while another went on to become a doctor who founded the Cancer Center at Vanderbilt University.

While Berea College’s business model may not be realistic for every higher education institution, maybe it can serve as an inspiration for leaders and decision-makers to seek alternatives to the current system that has resulted in student debt problems for so many.

Categories: News, Places
Tags: History, Mission, Student debt, tuition, Tuition-free

A Statement on Recent Events in Minneapolis

Beloved Bereans,

This week, our nation has been roiled yet again by the videotaped killing on an unarmed African American man: George Floyd. In our own beloved Kentucky, protestors are marching for justice for Breonna Taylor, an African American woman shot in her own home by the police. Even in the midst of a pandemic, people of color remain targets, often with little recourse. Christian Cooper was bird watching in Central Park this past weekend, and asked a young woman to put her dog on a leash, which was required in that park. Instead, she told him that she was going to “call the police and tell them that an African American man was threatening her and her dog.” The message was clear—Mr. Cooper would be perceived by the police as a threat to her, and would, subsequently, be punished.

In 1857, the United States Supreme Court made a decision that, it seems, follows to this day. After an enslaved man, Dred Scott, sued for his freedom after being taken by his “owner” into what was then a “free” territory, the court wrote that “They had for more than a century before been regarded as beings of an inferior order…: and so far inferior, that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect:…” (Dred Scott, 60 U.S.at 407). Today, we stand as a nation at a moment when we must decide if the language of the Dred Scott Decision will guide our future, or the language of The Declaration of Independence: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all (men) peoples are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness…”  Here at Berea College, we have long stood on the side of justice, and today, we remain steadfast, holding to the motto of our Founder, the great Abolitionist Reverend John G. Fee, taken from Acts: 17:26, “God has made of One Blood All Peoples of the Earth.” Berea College remains steadfast in its support of all marginalized communities and peoples, and we ask that all Bereans remember these individuals—that we remember their names and their stories. That we never forget that we are, indeed, one blood.

Signed,

Officers of the College: Lyle Roelofs, Linda Strong-Leek, Channell Barbour, Sylvia Asante, Jeff Amburgey, Chad Berry, Phillip Logsdon, Matt Saderholm, Derrick Singleton, Teri Thompson, Judge Wilson

Trustees of the College: Robert Yahng (Chair), Vance Blade (Vice Chair), Vicki Allums, Celeste Armstrong, Charlotte Beason, Anne Bonnyman, David H. Chow, Charles Crow, Libby Culbreth, Samantha Earp, John Fleming, Mike Flowers, Nana Lampton, Betty Olinger, Miriam Pride, Dennis Roop, David Sloan, Rocky Tuan, Diane Wallace, Stephanie Ziegler, Elton White (honorary)

Faculty of the College: Rebecca Bates, Mike Berheide, A.J. Bodnar (spouse), Jill Bouma, Richard Cahill, Mark Calkins, Beth Crachiolo, Jean Cupidon, Leonard Curry, Liza DiSavino, Ashley Elston, Robert Foster, Nancy Gift, Nicholas Hartlep, Richard Hale, Megan Hoffman, Connie Lamb, Shannon Phelps, Ed McCormack, Cindy McGaha, Meta Mendel-Reyes, Ian Norris, Amanda Peach, Loretta Reynolds, Mary Robert-Garrett, Ron Rosen, Tyler Sergent, Rob Smith, Bobby Starnes, Teri Thesing, Julian Viera, Penelope Wong, Stephanie Woodie,  Andrea Woodward

Staff of the College: Kishore Acharya, Dan Adams, Elaine Adams, Jenny Akins, T.J. Akins (spouse) Ray Arnold, Candis Arthur, Aaron Beale, Lisa Berry, Sarah Broomfield, Kim Brown, Susan Buckmaster, Charlie Campbell, Sarah Campbell, Nathaniel Clements, Ashley Cochrane, Jackie Collier, Abbie Darst, Richard Dodd, Gena Edwards, Mary Galloway, Judy Ginter, Andy Glenn, Amy Harmon, Ryan Hess, Mike Hogg, Alice Hooker, Terry Hosler, Leslie Kaylor, Tennant Kirk, Brittany Lakes, Julie LeBrun, Martina Leforce, Kelly Linville, Sheila Lyons, Laura Magner, Jason Miller, Sam Milligan, Dorothy Morgan, Judy Mott, Candace Mullins, Mark Nigro, Julianna O’Brien, Joan Pauly, Jessica Pena, Frank Polion, Laurie Roelofs, Sarah Rohrer, Lois Scott, Joanne Singh, Shawnna Southerland, Melissa Strobel, Sherry Thiele, Zack Thompson, Wendy Warren, Judith Weckman, Joe Wilkie, Crystal Wylie, Jenna Zimmerman

Students of the College: Cora Allison, Josiah Creech, Rachel Dodd, Amber Follin, Sean Mack, Eli Prater, Phoebe Weber

Retirees of the College: Kathryn Akural, Lothar Baumann, Carla Baumann, John Bolin, Sandra Bolin, Sandy Bolster, Steve Bolster, Jean Boyce, Robert Boyce, Peggy Burgio, Dorothy Chao (spouse), Eugene Chao, Debra Duerson-Swinford, Betty Hibler, Libby Jones, Roger Jones (spouse), Bill Laramee, Monica Laramee (spouse), Melissa Osborne, Harry Rice, Nancy Ryan, William Turner, Barbara Wade, Joan Weston

Alumni of the College: Dale Barlow, Donna Dean, Daniel Dennert, Carol Gilliam, Theresa Scherf

Members of the Berea community: Alice Zollicoffer

Categories: News, People
Tags: Civil Rights, Equality, Social Justice

Jessica Napier, Berea College Alumna, Nationally Recognized As Health Education Teacher of the Year

Jessica Napier ’00

Jessica Napier ’00 (Photo: LEX 18)

Jessica Napier, a 2000 graduate of Berea College, has been named National Health Education Teacher of the Year by SHAPE America, an organization that champions health and physical educators at every level, from preschool to university graduate programs.

(more…)

Categories: News, People
Tags:

Dr. Dwayne Mack appointed vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion at Berea College

Dr. Dwayne Mack

Dr. Dwayne Mack

Dr. Dwayne Mack was appointed vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion at Berea College effective July 1. Dr. Mack has been with the College since 2003 and has taught American history, African American history and general studies. He currently serves as professor of history and the Carter G. Woodson Chair in African American history. He brings to the position a wealth of knowledge from research and scholarship on diversity, equity and inclusion in higher education, the civil rights movement, interracial education and the gendered past of Berea College. In this position, Mack also will be a member of the Administrative Committee.

“My approach to the vice president role is rooted in my longstanding commitment to collaborative leadership that cultivates diversity, equity and inclusion,” Mack said. “Ultimately, my work is driven by a commitment to social equality, with the aim of generating practices that have a practical impact. Creating a campus climate that is inclusive and diverse, and supports our Great Commitments and Climate Assessment Report will continue to be the most meaningful and rewarding work of my professional career. It is at the core of my research and praxis.”

(more…)

Categories: News, People
Tags: African and African American Studies Department, Dr. Dwayne Mack, History Department, Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion

Berea College Announces Fulbright Awards for 2020-21

Two Berea College students received national recognition from the  Fulbright U.S. Student Program through the U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board.

Meredith Black ’19 received her Fulbright award to be an English Teaching Assistant (ETA) in Germany and Shelby Wheeler ’16 to be an ETA in Spain.

(more…)

Categories: News, People
Tags: Center for International Education, fulbright fellowship, Students

Three Berea College Students Named Thomas J. Watson Fellows

Berea College students Stephen Nwaloziri, Aloyce (Hans) Riziki and Sophia Winkowitsch have won the prestigious distinction of being members of the 52nd Class of Thomas J. Watson Fellows.

Sophia Winkowitsch

Sophia Winkowitsch

Watson Fellows are selected from just 40 private colleges and university partners across the United States making the Watson pool extremely competitive. This year there were 153 finalists who were nominated to compete on the national level, from which 47 Fellows were selected.

(more…)

Categories: News, People
Tags: Center for International Education, Students, Study abroad, Thomas J. Watson Fellowship

Weatherford Award Winners Named

The winners of this year’s Weatherford Awards for the best books about Appalachia are Appalachian Reckoning (non-fiction) edited by Anthony Harkins and Meredith McCarroll, Forage by Rose McLarney (poetry), and Any Other Place (fiction) by Michael Croley. The Weatherford Awards honor books deemed as best illuminating the challenges, personalities and unique qualities of the Appalachian South. Granted by Berea College and the Appalachian Studies Association for 50 years, the awards commemorate the life and achievements of W.D. Weatherford, Sr., a pioneer and leading figure in Appalachian development, youth work and race relations, and his son, Willis D. Weatherford, Jr., Berea College’s sixth President. These winning authors will be recognized at the 2020 Appalachian Studies Conference in Lexington, Kentucky on Friday, March 13. 

(more…)

Categories: News, People
Tags: Appalachian Studies Association, poetry, Weatherford Awards, writing

Dr. Nicholas D. Hartlep Recognized By DIVERSE as a 2020 Emerging Scholar

Nicholas Hartlep Portrait

Dr. Nicholas D. Hartlep
(Photo: Jennifer Lance ’20)

Dr. Nicholas D. Hartlep of Berea College’s education department has been named as a 2020 Emerging Scholar by DIVERSE, a national magazine focused on diverse issues in higher education. Hartlep, who is the Robert Charles Billings Chair in Education and chair of Berea College’s education studies department, is one of 15 minority scholars doing remarkable interdisciplinary work in the academic sphere. DIVERSE says the 2020 Emerging Scholars are recognized as academic leaders who represent the future of education. Read the full article in DIVERSE.

Categories: News, People
Tags: Diverse Issues in Higher Education, Diverse Magazine, Education Studies Department, Nicholas Hartlep

Samantha Shawn Earp Elected to Berea College Board of Trustees

Samantha Earp

Samantha Shawn Earp

Samantha Shawn Earp was elected to serve on the Berea College Board of Trustees for a six-year term.

Earp is vice president of information technology and chief information officer at Smith College, where her responsibilities include oversight of the college’s IT environment and management of the central IT organization. She also serves as a member of the president’s cabinet.

(more…)

Categories: News, People
Tags: Board of Trustees, Samantha Shawn Earp, trustee

Berea’s Westervelt Program Opens Spring Registration for Photography Course

Sarah Heggen

Sarah Heggen, owner of Light My Fire Photography, will instruct the Westervelt Program class focused on photography this spring.

The Berea College Technology and Applied Design department is accepting course registration for spring 2020 Westervelt Program classes, which will focus on photography. The class will begin Feb. 4, 2020, and will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in room B10 of the Danforth Technology building.  The instructor will be Sarah Heggen.

(more…)

Categories: News, Programs and Initiatives
Tags: photography, Technology and Applied Design Department, Westervelt program

Artist Kiana Honarmand Exhibits Work Giving Insight to the Injustices Faced by Iranian Women

Growing up in Iran, I felt stuck between tradition and modernity, as did many other people in my generation.”- Kiana Honarmand, 2019

The Doris Ulmann Galleries has opened an exhibition featuring works by artist Kiana Honarmand on view now until Feb. 27, 2020. The exhibit, Across the Space Separating, consists of a selection of Honarmand’s works that discuss the juxtaposition of her Middle Eastern identity and her education in Western art. Honarmand uses this duality in her identity to discuss sociopolitical issues of modern Iran, like the violation of women’s rights, as well as the Western perception of the Middle East as a whole.

(more…)

Categories: News, People
Tags: Art, Art Department, Doris Ulmann Galleries, Kiana Honarmand