Peace and Social Justice Studies Program

Jason Strange

Jason licking a cholla cactus.

Jason tasting a cholla cactus in Joshua Tree National Park.

Assistant Professor of General Studies and Peace & Social Justice

At Berea College since 2008

Contact Information:

Office: Draper 102A
Phone: (859) 985-3331
Fax: (859) 985-3906
E-Mail: Jason_Strange@berea.edu
CPO 1956

Office Hours, Spring 2015:

Mon/Wed: 10:45 am – 12:00 pm
Tue: 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Or By Appointment

Class Schedule:

  • GSTR 210 R (Mon/Wed/Fri: 9:20 am – 10:30 am)
  • GSTR 210 S (Mon/Wed/Fri: 1:20 pm – 2:30 pm)

About

Jason has lived in many different places, including a beautiful holler in eastern Kentucky, the Yurok Reservation in northern California, and the city of Oaxaca, Mexico. He recently finished a doctoral dissertation in Geography at UC Berkeley, which he hopes to turn into a book on back-to-the-land movements in the area around Berea. He enjoys many things, but especially writing, trail running, and hanging out with his six-year-old boy, Finn.

Degrees

  • B.S. Biology, Eastern Kentucky University, 2000
  • M.A. Geography, University of Kentucky, 2003
  • Ph.D. Geography, University of California, Berkeley, 2013

Courses

  • APS 226: Investigating Environmental Transformations in Appalachia. An ethnographic field course in which students use multiple research methods to examine the social and environmental consequences of the transition in eastern Kentucky from an agrarian society to an industrial one.APS 227: Investigating Environmental Movements in Appalachia.An ethnographic field course in which students use multiple research methods (primarily oral history) to examine the ongoing back-to-the-land movement in eastern Kentucky.
  • GST 150 and GSTR 110: Writing Seminar I: Critical Thinking in the Liberal Arts. A required first-year course that develops college writing and critical reasoning skills. Specific topic is open to the instructor. I have taught sections that examine: 1) global warming and alternative energy; 2) contemporary political economy in the US and its relation to class-based educational disparities; 3) the history of countercultures and cultural dissent in the US.
  • GSTR 210: Writing Seminar II: Identity and Diversity in the United States. A required first-year course that teaches students how to write a research paper, with the content focused on class, race, gender, and/or Appalachian identity in the US. Specific topic is open to instructor. I have taught sections that examine: 1) the construction of categories of gender and race, in both the natural and social sciences, and the consequences of these categories; 2) class, exploitation, and power in the contemporary US.
  • GSTR 332: Scientific Knowledge and Inquiry. A wonderful but grueling one-semester crash course in the natural sciences for non-science majors.
  • HIS 186: Introduction to Native America. A survey course on Native American history, culture, economics, and ecological interactions, which explores both the pre- and post-conquest time periods.
  • PSJ 100: Foundations of Peace and Social Justice. Explores major forms of contemporary global injustice, with an emphasis on the larger historical context of colonialism and capitalism, as well as upon successful cases of non-violent activism and resistance around the world; regional focus on Latin America.
  • SENS 125: Humans and Nature in the American West. A summer course where we traveled with students by van across the western US, examining the history of human-environment interactions; we looked at both Native American ecological regimes and those of the post-conquest colonial and US periods.

Selected Fellowships and Honors

  • 2014: Voted “Funniest Professor” by Berea College students.2012: Profiled in an article about the travel course SENS 125: Humans and Nature in the American West, in the Fall issue of Berea College Magazine (add link).2009: UC Berkeley Chancellor’s Dissertation Year Fellowship (one of twelve recipients for the entire Graduate Division), $30,000.
  • 2008: University of California Labor and Employment Research Fund Dissertation Fellowship, $30,000.
  • 2007: National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant, $10,000.
  • 2006: UC Berkeley Dean’s Normative Time Fellowship, $27,000.
  • 2001-05: National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, $102,000 over three years.
  • 2000: Kentucky Opportunity Fellowship, University of Kentucky, $28,000.
  • 2000: Daniel R. Reedy Quality Achievement Award, University of Kentucky, $9,600.
  • 1991: Associated Writing Programs National Poetry Award, for the poem “Voice Lessons,” published in Willow Springs.
  • 1990: Jodi Stutz Creative Writing Award, for the short story “The Midnight Time,” published in Toyon.

Publications and Presentations

  • Strange, J. (under revision). “Unearthing the back-to-the-land movement,” The Sixties.Strange, J. (in preparation). “Leaving the land: primitive accumulation, labor, and the transition to capitalism in eastern Kentucky.” For submission to The Journal of Appalachian Studies.Strange, J. (in preparation). “‘I don’t want to stay in a factory my whole life’: contemporary homesteading as labor resistance.” For submission to Geoforum.
  • Strange, J. (2013). Seeking Higher Ground: Contemporary Back-to-the-Land Movements in Eastern Kentucky. (Doctoral dissertation). UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.
  • Strange, J. (2013). “Voluntary enclosure and the transition to capitalism in Appalachian Kentucky.” Association of American Geographers, Los Angeles.
  • Strange, J. (2013). Invited panel discussant, “Doing more with less I: strategies for teaching geography with shrinking and shifting resources.” Association of American Geographers, Los Angeles.
  • Strange, J. (2013). Session co-organizer and discussant, “The rise, decline, (and rise again?) of the middle classes.” Association of American Geographers, Los Angeles.
  • Strange, J. (2013). “The multiple meanings of nature among contemporary homesteaders in Appalachia.” Dimensions of Political Ecology, Lexington, Kentucky.
  • Strange, J. (2013). “Hicks, hippies, and the back-to-the-land movement.” Appalachian Studies Conference, Boone, North Carolina.
  • Strange, J. (2012). “A conflation of Karls: the unfortunate jumbling of Marx and Polanyi in the concept of neoliberalism.” Dimensions of Political Ecology, Lexington, Kentucky.
  • Strange, J. (2012). “Unearthing the back-to-the-land movement in Eastern Kentucky.” Association of American Geographers, New York.
  • Strange, J. (2011). “Contemporary Appalachian homesteading as a form of labor resistance.” Dimensions of Political Ecology, Lexington, Kentucky.
  • Strange, J. (2007). Invited panel discussant, “Appalachian folkways as sustainability education.” Campus-Community Partnerships for Sustainability, Richmond, Kentucky.
  • Strange, J. (2002). “Hidden by the shade: the construction and marketing of the small coffee farmer.” Association of American Geographers, Los Angeles.

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