Catalog & Student Handbook

Music Theory, Literature, and Methods Courses

(Also see MUS-designated applied-music and ensemble course listings, as well as MUA applied (private) lessons)

Please note that the frequency of course offerings below is subject to change without notice, because of changes in faculty availability, sabbaticals and leaves, and other circumstances. Please consult the latest Schedule of Classes (and supplement), myBerea, revisions to online Catalog & Student Handbook, and/or the Program Coordinator to determine if a course will be offered during a certain term or year, especially if Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is a factor.

MUS 106

World Music

Offered: Typically annually (next offered term yet to be determined)

This course will examine the music within four cultures: Native American, Indian, African, and African-American. The music of each culture will be examined within the context of its history, peoples, and traditions. Musical examples, videos, oral presentations, class demonstrations, and special programs/concerts will be included. Students also will attend several College convocations and discuss, compare, and reflect on the various music cultures and experiences. Arts Perspective and World Culture (Non-Western) component in the International Perspective.

1 Course

MUS 115

Intro to Music Literature

Offered: Typically every Spring Term

An introduction to the study of music literature. Students in this course will be introduced to significant musical pieces from the major historical periods and will learn to distinguish the musical stylistic characteristics of those periods. Emphasis will be on the development of listening skills and appropriate methods and abilities to analyze, interpret, discuss, and write about music. Although the focus of the literature will be music from the Western art music tradition, selected examples of music from other world cultures will be included. May include required attendance of live musical performances on campus or in the region, as available and appropriate. Four periods per week. Arts Perspective.

1 Course

MUS 125

Fundamentals of Music I

Prerequisite: None
Offered: Typically every Fall Term

An introduction to reading music, including musical symbols and terminology, rhythm and meter, scales, key signatures, intervals, and chords. Both written and aural skills are developed. Simply musical forms and music literature are include. Designed particularly for prospective Music majors and minors who need further development of fundamental written and/or aural skills in music in preparation for courses in the Materials of Music and Aural Harmony sequence. Two to three class periods per week. This course also is open to the general College student who wishes to develop fundamental knowledge and skills in music.

1/2 Course

MUS 126

Fundamentals of Music II

Prerequisite: MUS 125 or Permission of Instructor
Offered: Typically every Spring Term

Continuation of MUS 125. Further development of fundamental written and aural skills in reading music, rhythm and meter, scales, key signatures, intervals, and chords. Simple musical forms and music literature are included. Designed particularly for prospective Music majors and minors who need further development of fundamental written and/or aural skills in music in preparation for courses in the Materials of Music and Aural Harmony sequnce. Three class periods per week. This course also is open to the general College student who wishes to develop fundamental knowledge and skills in music.

1/2 Course

MUS 128B

The Complete Performer: Ragtim

A small group (15-35) of versatile actors/dancers/musicians will be chosen to perform in a fully-staged concert performance production of the Broadway Musical Ragtime. The class will explore the social, historical and stylistic musical and theatrical elements of Ragtime performance practices through study, discussion, rehearsal, and performance. Class activities will take place in Presser Music Building¿s Gray Auditorium and classrooms 128 and 223. The class will culminate in three fully-staged concert performances in Gray Auditorium on Friday evening, July 6, Saturday evening, July 7, with a Sunday matinee performance July 8. All students will work on theatrical elements of the production in addition to performing in the show. A limited number of off-campus performances may occur at various Berea College Alumni Clubs, or for regional arts organizations.

A group of student assistants, possibly class members, will be selected by interviews with the instructors to be in charge of various facets of the production. Assistants may be chosen for the following functions, or combinations thereof: (1) design and layout publicity materials, programs, and other decorations; design props; set painting, (2) stage manager, (3) set designer, in charge of lighting, designing and constructing set pieces, and construction of props, (4) costume/make-up artist to assist in costuming the cast of 15-35 members, including designing and building costume pieces (5 administrative assistant, to be in charge of ticket sales; and to serve as ombudsperson, (6) one or two teaching assistants/assistant conductors to assist the instructors in teaching the class and in leading rehearsals, and (7) two rehearsal/performance pianists.

1 Course

MUS 186

Special Topics

Prerequisites: Determined by instructor

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course designed to meet the particular interests of student and faculty. Topics vary from year to year. See course description in the “Schedule of Classes.”

1/2 to 1 Course

MUS 211

Travel to Ghana: Afr Mus (AFR)

This course will be an exploration of primarily West African music and literature. We will explore issues including the enslavement of Africans; the colonization of Africa, focusing on the West African context; and the experiences of decolonized African peoples. We will participate in seminars which focus on the political, economic, and social realities of the peoples of the African Diaspora primarily through a musical and literary lens, but we will also read and discuss works about African politics and philosophy. This course will include travel to various cultural centers and rural areas in surrounding regions of the country Ghana. While Dr. Bullock and Dr. Leek will be the primary instructors, we will also have local instructors who will teach seminars on African culture, philosophy, religion, drumming, and dance, to name a few.
1 Course

MUS 216

Perceptive Listening to Music

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A study of one or more of the arts, or of a particular medium, in a cultural, cross-cultural, or historical context. Attention will be given to form, structure, style, and other critical considerations. The course will have a research component. The primary focus of this course is the enhancement of the joy of listening to music through the development of music-listening skills in the framework of perceiving and understanding musical information. Emphasis on the attentive style of listening, the elements of music, and the variety of musical styles will be the three areas used to develop such a framework. Arts Perspective. NOTE: Noncredit for students who completed this course as GSTR 209.

1 Course

MUS 220

Materials of Music I

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Offered: Typically every Fall Term

Beginning a four-term sequence of courses in the theoretical approach to music, this is a study of the properties of sound, the overtone series, symbols of notation, rhythm, intervals, scales, and key signatures. Harmonic studies include triads and their inversions, phrase structure and cadences, and harmonic progressions. The course will focus on playing major and minor scales, all triad types and their inversions, and basic chord progres?sions using primary triads. Two class periods per week plus a keyboard lab. Usually taken in conjunction with MUS 221. NOTE: Noncredit for students who completed MUS 120.

1/2 Course

MUS 221

Aural Harmony I

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Offered: Typically every Fall Term

The relationship between the printed musical symbol and its auditory representation. The “musical ear” is developed through the sight-singing of simple melodies, intervals, scales, and rhythmic patterns. Brief exercises in melodic and rhythmic dictation and conducting patterns. Three periods per week. Usually taken in conjunction with MUS 220 (formerly 120). NOTE: Noncredit for students who completed MUS 312.

1/2 Course

MUS 222

Materials of Music II

Prerequisite: MUS 220 (formerly 120)

Offered: Typically every Spring Term

Continuation of MUS 220. The study of non-harmonic tones, seventh chords, modulation, the four-part chorale style, and keyboard style. Music forms, introductory counterpoint, and analysis of works from music literature. Playing basic chord progressions using the secondary as well as primary triads, harmonizing simple melodies, simple transposition, and basic harmonic progressions in four parts. Two class periods per week plus a keyboard lab. Usually taken in conjunction with MUS 223 (formerly 313). NOTE: Noncredit for students who completed MUS 121.

1/2 Course

MUS 223

Aural Harmony II

Prerequisite: MUS 221 (formerly 121)

Offered: Typically every Spring Term

Continuation of MUS 221. Further studies in sight-singing; melodic and rhythmic dictation; harmonic backgrounds and part-singing; syncopation; and beginning harmonic dictation. Three periods per week. Usually taken in conjunction with MUS 222 (formerly 312). NOTE: Noncredit for students who completed MUS 313.

1/2 Course

MUS 224

Appalachian Music (APS)

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

An introduction to the music that has been, and is, an important part of the culture of the Southern Appalachian region. Specific musical elements will be discussed in relation to ballads and songs, instrumental music, bluegrass, country, and various types of religious music. The importance of the region’s music and musicians in the development of country and popular music in America is treated. Three periods per week. Arts Perspective and African Americans’, Appalachians’, and Women’s Perspective.

1 Course

MUS 234

Afri-Amer Mus:Overview (AFR)

Prerequisite: GSTR 110

Offered: Typically every Spring Term (next offered term yet to be determined)

The study of African-American music and musicians within the general framework of American society, tracing the development of the music from its African origins to its impact upon and fusion with American music and culture. Although the main focus will be placed upon music indigenous to African-American culture, study will encompass significant African-American musicians in the European classical music tradition. Arts Perspective and African Americans’, Appalachians’, Women’s Perspective.

1 Course

MUS 286

Special Topics

Prerequisites: Determined by instructor

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course designed to meet the particular interests of student and faculty. Topics vary from year to year. See course description in the “Schedule of Classes.”

1/2 to 1 Course

MUS 320

Materials of Music III

Prerequisite: MUS 222 (formerly 312)

Offered: Typically every Fall Term

Continuation of MUS 222. Seventh chords, altered chords, chromatic harmony, modulation, musical forms, and analysis of musical examples from the common practice period. Three periods per week. Usually taken in conjunction with MUS 321.

1/2 Course

MUS 321

Aural & Keyboard Harmony III

Prerequisite: MUS 223 (formerly 313)

Offered: Typically every Fall Term

Continuation of MUS 223. Sight-singing of diatonic and chromatic melodies; use of computers in developing aural skills; melodic, rhythmic, contrapuntal, and harmonic dictation. Harmonizing melodies at the piano keyboard. Two periods per week. Usually taken in conjunction with MUS 320.

1/2 Course

MUS 322

Materials of Music IV

Prerequisite: MUS 320

Offered: Typically every Spring Term

Continuation of MUS 320. Modulation to remote keys, chords of multiple thirds, larger musical forms, alternatives to traditional harmony, impressionism atonality, polytonality, serialism, electronic music, minimalism, and new systems of notation. Analysis of late 19th- and 20th-century works. Creative writing in various styles. Three periods per week. Usually taken in conjunction with MUS 323.

1/2 Course

MUS 323

Aural & Keyboard Harmony IV

Prerequisite: MUS 321

Offered: Typically every Spring Term

Continuation of MUS 321. Sight-singing of modulating; modal, tonal, and atonal melodies; and melodic, contrapuntal and harmonic dictation. Continuation of computer usage in furthering aural skills. Keyboard skills include harmonization using diatonic and altered chords, transposition, chord symbols, improvisation, and figured bass. Preparation for Piano Proficiency Examination. Two periods per week. Usually taken in conjunction with MUS 322.

1/2 Course

MUS 324

Music Composition

Offered: Typically Fall and Spring terms, as student interest and faculty availability allow (offered Spring only in 2010-2011)

Selected topics in composition are studied, such as texture; tonal and serial procedures; melody with accompaniment; and idiomatic writing for instruments and voices. Students use skills acquired through previous study of theory, harmony, and musical analysis in arranging and creating pieces in small and large forms. A weekly seminar (one hour) and individual conferences (one-half hour) focus on the creation of original works by students and detailed analysis of works that exemplify the selected topics. Students also will gain familiarity with computer programs in music notation and publishing. Individual assignments are made on the basis of each student’s ability, training, and experience. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

1/2 Course

MUS 326

Vocal Methods

Prerequisite: MUS 223 (formerly 313) or permission of instructor

Offered: Typically alternate Fall terms (next offered Fall 2010)

A course in the fundamentals of singing for grades K-12 and how these fundamentals may be used in effective instruction of students in a school’s music program to develop healthy singing habits and music reading independence. Special attention is given to the physical and psychological aspects of vocal pedagogy for unchanged and changing voices, along with methods appropriate to the choral rehearsal. Focus is also given to the benefits of vocal music for students with special needs, and the benefits of including special needs students in the school choir. Coursework will include a survey of choral music, choral literature, and choral resources as it applies to the school music program at all levels.

1 Course

MUS 328

Tchg Brass & Percussion Instru

Prerequisite: Admission to Music or Music Education major; OR permission of instructor

Offered: Typically alternate Spring terms (next offered Spring 2011)

A study of the materials, methods, literature, and pedagogy of brass and percussion instruments. Course requirements include reading and research assignments, examination of appropriate materials and equipment, a performance and teaching laboratory component, and practicum experiences. Three class meetings per week.

1/2 Course

MUS 329

Teaching Woodwind Instruments

Prerequisite: Admission to Music or Music Education major; OR permission of instructor

Offered: Typically alternate Fall Terms (next offered Fall 2010)

A study of the materials, literature, and pedagogy of woodwind instruments. Course requirements include reading and research assignments, examination of appropriate materials and equipment, a performance and teaching laboratory component, and practicum experiences. Three class meetings per week.

1/2 Course

MUS 330

Music History I

Prerequisites: Declared Music or Music Education major or Music minor; and MUS 222 (formerly 312); OR permission of instructor

Offered: Typically alternate years (MUS 330 next offered Fall 2010 and MUS 331 next offered Spring 2011)

An upper-level historical survey of Western music–its styles, genres, composers, and works. A “music-centered” course, this survey will include analysis of representative works of the music literature. The music of classical Greece and the early Christian era through the Baroque, first term; the Classic era to the present day, second term. Four periods per week.

1 Course

MUS 331

Music History II

Prerequisites: Declared Music or Music Education major or Music minor; and MUS 222 (formerly 312); OR permission of instructor

Offered: Typically alternate years (MUS 330 next offered Fall 2010 and MUS 331 next offered Spring 2011)

An upper-level historical survey of Western music–its styles, genres, composers, and works. A “music-centered” course, this survey will include analysis of representative works of the music literature. The music of classical Greece and the early Christian era through the Baroque, first term; the Classic era to the present day, second term. Four periods per week.

1 Course

MUS 335

Mat & Meth of Elem Music

Prerequisite: Admission to Music or Music Education major; OR permission of instructor

Offered: Typically alternate Spring Terms (next expected to be offered 2011-2012)

An introduction to philosophies, methodologies, and pedagogical foundations of teaching music in elementary schools, including, but not limited to, the music teaching philosophies of Kodaly, Orff, Dalcroze, and Gordon. Course activities will include review of materials, assigned readings, research, class discussions, practical teaching laboratory sessions, and practicum experiences. Assessment, planning, and implementation of music education activities for people with unique needs and abilities will be covered. Special attention is directed to preparing performance evidence of addressing New Teacher Standards I-IV. Four meetings per week.

1 Course

MUS 336

Fund Tchg Instrumental Music

Prerequisites: Music majors only or by permission of instructor; EDS 150 (formerly 250); and MUS 223 (formerly 313)

Offered: Typically alternate Fall Terms (next expected to be offered Fall 2011)

This course provides an overview of the instrumental music-education profession, including the philosophy, methodology, and pedagogical foundations that are essential for successful teaching. Students will be directed in their development of musical teaching-assessment, administrative, and personal skillls that are necessary for successful teaching. Assessment, planning and implementation of music education activities for people with unique needs and abilities will be covered. Special attention is directed to preparing performance evidence of addressing New Teacher STandards I-IV. Four periods per week.

1 Course

MUS 337

Conducting

Prerequisite: MUS 223 (formerly 313)

Offered: Typically alternate Fall Terms (next expected to be offered Fall 2011)

Study and practice of beat patterns, baton technique, left-hand functions, cueing, pulse changes, recitative conducting, error detection, score reading, score marking, and other techniques used in instrumental and choral conducting. Practical experience. Concurrent participation in ensemble of major applied instrument (MUS 131, 132, or 135) is required for laboratory experience. Four periods per week.

1 Course

MUS 340O

Organ Pedagogy

Prerequisite: MUA 221 (organ) or permission of instructor

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A study of instructional methods and materials used in teaching organ, as well as performance practices and problems. Each person enrolled in the course will teach lessons to two beginning organ students during the term, gaining practical experience in pedagogy. Two periods per week plus one hour teaching.

1/2 Course

MUS 340P

Piano Pedagogy

Prerequisite: MUA 221p (piano) or permission of instructor

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

Lectures and discussion of teaching skills on all levels, in addition to a survey of methods and materials. Private and class teaching methods. Two periods per week.

1/2 Course

MUS 341

Studio Teaching

Prerequisite: MUS 340p

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

Supervised teaching of piano with related discussions in a weekly seminar. One-hour seminar, plus two periods of teaching per week.

1/2 Course

MUS 342V

Voice Pedagogy & Diction

Prerequisite: MUA 326v (voice) or permission of instructors

Offered: Typically alternate Spring terms (next offered Spring 2012)

A study of the physiological functions involved in singing (breathing, phonation, etc.). Consideration of vocal methods, use of imagery in teaching, resonance, tone quality, placement, vocalization, diction (Italian, German, French, and English) including a working knowledge of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), and interpretation. There will be many reading assignments, as well as listening to recordings and observing singers. Practical experience will be obtained by working with members of the voice class. Four periods per week: one day will be a laboratory experience.

1 Course

MUS 350O

Organ Literature I

Prerequisite: MUA 221o (organ) or permission of instructor

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A comprehensive introduction to organ literature, including the historical development of the organ. Characteristic forms, compositional styles, and the various “schools” of organ composition are traced from the Medieval through the Classic era. Representative organ works are heard live or through recordings made on historic instruments. Two periods per week.

1/2 Course

MUS 350P

Piano Literature I

Prerequisite: MUA 221p (piano) or permission of instructor

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

The study of the history and literature of piano music as it developed through the ages. Starting with the early national schools of keyboard music and progressing through the music of Beethoven, the course will deal with different phases of keyboard development, the more important musical forms, performance practice, and the significant piano music of the major composers of each era. Individual research, some informal performance in class by both the teacher and the student, as well as outside listening, will be included. Two periods per week.

1/2 Course

MUS 351O

Organ Literature II

Prerequisite: MUS 350o or permission of instructor

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A continuation of MUS 350o, with works from the Romantic period through the 20th century being played, heard, and discussed. The development of 19th- and 20th-century organs and their influence on compositional style. Two periods per week.

1/2 Course

MUS 351P

Piano Literature II

Prerequisite: MUS 350p or permission of instructor

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A continuation of MUS 350p including the Romantic composers through the present day. Schools of technique and 19th- and 20th-century pianists also will be studied. Two periods per week.

1/2 Course

MUS 352

Vocal Literature

Prerequisite: MUA 326 (voice) or permission of instructor

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course to familiarize the student with the vocal forms, styles, and repertoire of Early English Baroque period; 18th-, 19th- and 20th-century Italian, French, German, British, and American art song literature; and sacred vocal literature. There will be comprehensive weekly listening and reading assignments and some singing. Four periods per week; one day will be a laboratory experience.

1 Course

MUS 386

Special Topics

Prerequisites: Determined by instructor

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course designed to meet the particular interests of student and faculty. Topics vary from year to year. See course description in the “Schedule of Classes.”

1/2 to 1 Course

MUS 390A

Independent Study

Prerequisite: Sophomore or junior standing for 390; senior standing for 490

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course initiated, directed, and organized by the student and the faculty sponsor. Course proposals must meet the guidelines and approval of the Academic Department or Interdisciplinary Program in which the study will be conducted. A detailed information sheet is available in the Student Self-Service room (101 Lincoln), which includes the form to complete if seeking Active Learning Experience (ALE) credit. A course syllabus must be submitted with the Chairperson or Director’s approval before the course can be registered. Those approved as ALE will be registered as 390/490A; others will be 390/490B.

1 Course

MUS 390B

Independent Study w/o ALE

Prerequisite: Sophomore or junior standing for 390; senior standing for 490

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course initiated, directed, and organized by the student and the faculty sponsor. Course proposals must meet the guidelines and approval of the Academic Department or Interdisciplinary Program in which the study will be conducted. A detailed information sheet is available in the Student Self-Service room (101 Lincoln), which includes the form to complete if seeking Active Learning Experience (ALE) credit. A course syllabus must be submitted with the Chairperson or Director’s approval before the course can be registered. Those approved as ALE will be registered as 390/490A; others will be 390/490B.

1 Course

MUS 395

Internship

Prerequisite: Sophomore, junior, or senior standing

Offered: Typically every term

An experiential learning experience individually designed for students with a special academic interest requiring integration of classroom learning with practical experience. Includes on-campus seminars with academic sponsors, as well as non-classroom experience. One to 3 course credits in one regular term; 1.5 course credits in Summer One Term; or 1 to 2 course credits in Summer Two Term may be taken in Internships. Requires the approval of two faculty sponsors and the Program assumes the responsibility for determining credit allowance. The Coordinator of Internships gives final approval for Internship proposals. All Internships meet the Active Learning Experience (ALE) requirement.

1 Course

MUS 397A

Team Initiated Study

Prerequisite: Sophomore or junior standing for 397; senior standing for 497

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course initiated, directed, and organized by the student and the faculty sponsor. Course proposals must meet the guidelines and approval of the Academic Department or Interdisciplinary Program in which the study will be conducted. A detailed information sheet is available in the Student Self-Service room (101 Lincoln), which includes the form to complete if seeking Active Learning Experience (ALE) credit. A course syllabus must be submitted with the Chairperson or Director’s approval before the course can be registered. Those approved as ALE will be registered as 397/497A; others will be 397/497B.

1 Course

MUS 397B

Team Initiated Study w/o ALE

Prerequisite: Sophomore or junior standing for 397; senior standing for 497

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course initiated, directed, and organized by the student and the faculty sponsor. Course proposals must meet the guidelines and approval of the Academic Department or Interdisciplinary Program in which the study will be conducted. A detailed information sheet is available in the Student Self-Service room (101 Lincoln), which includes the form to complete if seeking Active Learning Experience (ALE) credit. A course syllabus must be submitted with the Chairperson or Director’s approval before the course can be registered. Those approved as ALE will be registered as 397/497A; others will be 397/497B.

1 Course

MUS 398

Directed Study

Prerequisites: Will vary, but always will include permission of instructor

Offered: Typically on a limited basis as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course organized and directed by faculty and approved by the Program Director or Department Chairperson to meet the particular interests and/or needs of specific students.

1 Course

MUS 400

Senior Seminar

Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of instructor

Offered: Typically every Spring Term

Senior Seminar is designed to be the capstone experience of the Music Department’s core curriculum. As such, the seminar will focus on the research, study, practice, and implementation of the senior Music major’s final project, which will consist of a final paper, and a performance or other public presentation. The seminar will function as a laboratory for students to present ideas and receive feedback as they work collaboratively and individually in completing their projects. As a culmination and integration of training and learning and as preparation for their professional future, this seminar provides an important support structure and learning community for Music majors. Course will meet once per week. NOTE: Required of all General Music majors, and part of an optional course sequence for Music Education majors. Students in General Music may take MUS 400 (1/2 credit) and MUA 400 (1/2 credit) to fulfill the Senior Seminar requirement if they do a recital and pass a recital preview. Other General Music majors will take MUS 400 as a one-credit course. Music Education majors may choose to take the course as 1/2 or full credit, in consultation with their Academic Advisor.

1/2 to 1 Course

MUS 486

Special Topics

Prerequisites: Determined by instructor

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course designed to meet the particular interests of student and faculty. Topics vary from year to year. See course description in the “Schedule of Classes.”

1/2 to 1 Course

MUS 490A

Independent Study

Prerequisite: Sophomore or junior standing for 390; senior standing for 490

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course initiated, directed, and organized by the student and the faculty sponsor. Course proposals must meet the guidelines and approval of the Academic Department or Interdisciplinary Program in which the study will be conducted. A detailed information sheet is available in the Student Self-Service room (101 Lincoln), which includes the form to complete if seeking Active Learning Experience (ALE) credit. A course syllabus must be submitted with the Chairperson or Director’s approval before the course can be registered. Those approved as ALE will be registered as 390/490A; others will be 390/490B.

1 Course

MUS 490B

Independent Study w/o ALE

Prerequisite: Sophomore or junior standing for 390; senior standing for 490

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course initiated, directed, and organized by the student and the faculty sponsor. Course proposals must meet the guidelines and approval of the Academic Department or Interdisciplinary Program in which the study will be conducted. A detailed information sheet is available in the Student Self-Service room (101 Lincoln), which includes the form to complete if seeking Active Learning Experience (ALE) credit. A course syllabus must be submitted with the Chairperson or Director’s approval before the course can be registered. Those approved as ALE will be registered as 390/490A; others will be 390/490B.

1 Course

MUS 495

Internship

Prerequisite: Sophomore, junior, or senior standing

Offered: Typically every term

An experiential learning experience individually designed for students with a special academic interest requiring integration of classroom learning with practical experience. Includes on-campus seminars with academic sponsors, as well as non-classroom experience. One to 3 course credits in one regular term; 1.5 course credits in Summer One Term; or 1 to 2 course credits in Summer Two Term may be taken in Internships. Requires the approval of two faculty sponsors and the Program assumes the responsibility for determining credit allowance. The Coordinator of Internships gives final approval for Internship proposals. All Internships meet the Active Learning Experience (ALE) requirement.

1 to 3 Courses

MUS 497A

Team Initiated Study

Prerequisite: Sophomore or junior standing for 397; senior standing for 497

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course initiated, directed, and organized by the student and the faculty sponsor. Course proposals must meet the guidelines and approval of the Academic Department or Interdisciplinary Program in which the study will be conducted. A detailed information sheet is available in the Student Self-Service room (101 Lincoln), which includes the form to complete if seeking Active Learning Experience (ALE) credit. A course syllabus must be submitted with the Chairperson or Director’s approval before the course can be registered. Those approved as ALE will be registered as 397/497A; others will be 397/497B.

1 Course

MUS 497B

Team Initiated Study w/o ALE

Prerequisite: Sophomore or junior standing for 397; senior standing for 497

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course initiated, directed, and organized by the student and the faculty sponsor. Course proposals must meet the guidelines and approval of the Academic Department or Interdisciplinary Program in which the study will be conducted. A detailed information sheet is available in the Student Self-Service room (101 Lincoln), which includes the form to complete if seeking Active Learning Experience (ALE) credit. A course syllabus must be submitted with the Chairperson or Director’s approval before the course can be registered. Those approved as ALE will be registered as 397/497A; others will be 397/497B.

1 Course

MUS 498

Directed Study

Prerequisites: Will vary, but always will include permission of instructor

Offered: Typically on a limited basis as student interest and faculty availability allow

A course organized and directed by faculty and approved by the Program Director or Department Chairperson to meet the particular interests and/or needs of specific students.

1 Course

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