Asian Studies Program

Spring Term 2014 Courses

AST 102 Introduction to Japanese II (JPN)

Instructor: Nathan Patton

Prerequisite: JPN/AST 101 w/ C or higher or Permission of Instructor

Offered: Typically every Spring Term

Continued emphasis on Japanese oral/aural communication skills and an introduction to the Japanese written language.

1 Course

 

AST 104 Introduction to Japanese IV (JPN)

Instructor: Nathan Patton

Prerequisite: JPN/AST 103 w/ C or higher or Permission of Instructor

Offered: Typically every Spring Term

Completion of the two-term intermediate level of Japanese language instruction; continued practice of reading, writing, listening, and speaking, fully integrated with culture.

1 Course

 

AST 123 History of Japan (HIS)

Instructor: Robert Foster

Offered: Typically every Spring Term

Japan has developed from an isolated chain of islands at the edge of East Asia into a modern economic giant. Through close reading of documents, focused analytical writing, open discussion and lecture, we will examine the complexity of the culture that gave rise to Zen Buddhism, the samurai, and Japan’s current position as one of the world’s most powerful economies.  Fulfills International (Non-Western) Perspective requirement.

1 Course

 

AST 204 Yoga (PED)

Instructors: Stephanie Woodie / Sarah Downs

Prerequisite: PEH 100 or Permission of Instructor

Offered: Typically every Spring Term

A study of the asanas (poses) included in the practice of Hatha Yoga. The focus will be on connecting breath with movement, developing ease and comfort in poses and developing skills in using yoga as a tool for increased self-awareness. The content will include basic history of yoga and asanas. Students will be required to purchase a yoga mat that they will keep throughout the term.

1 Course

 

AST 260 Buddhism (REL)

Instructor: Jeffrey L. Richey

Prerequisite: GSTR 110 or waiver

Offered: Typically alternate years (next offered Spring 2016)

A study of the history and diversity of Buddhist traditions, from the time of the Buddha in 5th century BCE India to contemporary Buddhist communities in Asia and the West. Special attention will be given to the problems and prospects of Buddhism in relation to contemporary issues, such as gender and sexuality, ecological change, and the relationship between religion and politics.  Fulfills International (Non-Western) and Religion Perspective requirements.

1 Course

 

AST 322 Seminar in Chinese History: “The Silk Road and China” (HIS)

Instructor: Robert Foster

Prerequisite: AST/HIS 122 or 123 or permission of instructor.

Offered: Typically alternate years (next offered Spring 2016)

The Silk Road is the ancient trade network that connected all parts of Eurasia.  Best known as the path by which silk from China entered Europe, it was the route that Marco Polo traveled in the 13th century from Venice to China.  Through literature, archaeology, art, and historical texts, this course examines the interchange of goods and ideas along the Silk Road.  We will discuss the historical development of the route, whether Polo actually made it to China, how the route enabled the spread of religions such as Buddhism, Islam, and Nestorian Christianity, and how the lure of the Silk Road’s legends encouraged modern adventurers to search for lost cities along its length.  Fulfills International (Non-Western) Perspective requirement.

1 Course

 

AST 401 Senior Seminar in Asian Studies

Instructor: Robert Foster

Prerequisite: Senior standing, or permission of instructor

Offered: Annually

Through common readings and independent work, students will explore various views of Asia, past and present, from within Asia and from without. Through the common readings, students will deal with central questions regarding geographic visions of Asia, the reality or unreality of “Asia,” key issues for the region, etc. Through regular presentations of ongoing individual projects, students will learn from each other about diverse Asia-related issues. For example, one day, students might all read an address written by the President of the American Association of Asian Studies, followed by individual presentations on aspects of Shinto religion, followed by the politics of the partition of India, followed by current concerns with North Korea. The course is intentionally open-ended and free-flowing both to encompass specific student interests and to develop the ability to think broadly about Asia.

1 Course

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