Asian Studies Program

Fall Term 2012 Courses

 

AST 101 Introduction to Japanese I (JPN)

Instructor: N. Patton

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Typically every Fall Term

Introduction to Japanese as it is spoken in Japan today. Speaking and listening comprehension will be emphasized.

1 Course

AST 103 Introduction to Japanese III (JPN)

Instructor: N. Patton

Prerequisite: JPN 102 with a grade of C or higher, or permission of instructor

Offered: Typically every Fall Term

Continued development of Japanese speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.

1 Course

AST 122 History of China (HIS)

Instructor: Robert Foster

Prerequisite:

Offered:Typically every Fall Term

China has one of the foundational civilizations in human history. It gave rise to social structures, political systems, and philosophies that deeply influenced the development of East Asia. Through close reading of documents, focused analytical writing, open discussion, and lecture, students will develop their own understanding of the evolution of China from its Neolithic origins to its present status as a world power. Fulfills International (Non-Western) Perspective requirement.

1 Course

AST 132 Religions of China (REL)

Instructor: Jeffrey L. Richey

Prerequisite:

Offered:Typically alternate years (next offered in 2014-2015)

A study of the principal religious traditions of China: Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism. The course includes readings in the classical primary texts of each tradition as well as attention to ritual and practice.  Fulfills International (Non-Western) and Religion Perspective requirements.

1 Course

AST 186 History of South Asia (HIS)

Instructor: Uma Ganesan

Prerequisite:

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

An introduction to the history of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh). Fulfills International (Non-Western) Perspective requirement.

1 Course

AST 186 Survey of Asian Art (ARH)

Instructor: C. Wang

Prerequisite:

Offered:Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow.

This course provides an introductory overview of the visual cultures of Asia, including India, Southeast Asia, Tibet, China, Korea, and Japan through an exploration of the major religious and secular artistic traditions from prehistory to the 21st century. Special attention will be given to placing the arts within their historical and cultural contexts of social history, religious background, philosophical orientation, and aesthetic ideals. The course format will be a combination of lecture, video, class discussion, projects and reports, and museum field trip.

1 Course

AST 204 Yoga (PED)

Instructor: Sarah Downs

Prerequisite: PEH 100 or permission of instructor

Offered: Typically alternate years

A study of the asanas (poses) included in the practice of Hatha Yoga. The focus will be on connecting breath with movement, developing ease and comfort in poses and developing skills in using yoga as a tool for increased self-awareness. The content will include basic history of yoga, and asanas. Students will be required to purchase a yoga mat that they will keep throughout the term.

1/4 Course

AST 205 Tai Chi (PED)

Instructor: Martha Beagle

Prerequisite:PEH 100 or permission of instructor

Offered:Typically alternate years (next offered in 2014-15)

Because of its movement and mind/body focus, the benefits of Tai Chi on dynamic balance, relaxation, and sustained mental attention have been recognized by those who engage in all kinds of activities.  Students of Tai Chi will learn the Yang (short form) style of Tai Chi as well as the mind-body connection in accordance with the principles and techniques of Tai Chi to help enrich one’s life.  Tai Chi is scientifically designed to help all students maintain a healthy body through stretching, breathing and meditation.

1/4 Course

AST 229 Modern Imperialism (HIS)

Instructor: Uma Ganesan

Prerequisite: HIS 102, AST/HIS 122, AST/HIS 123, or GSTR 210

This course is a selective exploration of imperialism using a comparative historical perspective. Beginning with a reflection on the meanings of “empire,” the course explores the rise of European empires during the “high colonialism” of the 19th and 20th centuries. This course then will explore the expansion of European colonialism and regional responses–including local resistance, national revolutions, and the development of the Soviet and Japanese Empires. After examining the dynamics of imperial decline between 1919 and 1945, the course will conclude by considering the status of empires in the post-World War II period. Fulfills International (Non-Western) Perspective requirement.

1 Course

AST 286 Kinship and Gender in Southeast Asia (SOC)

Instructor: Gordon Gray

Prerequisite: Determined by instructor

Offered: Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow

Southeast Asia is perhaps one of the most fascinating, yet often misunderstood, areas of the world. For instance, during the 1970s, US academics and policymakers predicted that the area would be one of the world’s trouble spots. Southeast Asia, it was predicted, would be wracked with strife between its constituent countries. While there has been much internal strife (Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia/Kampuchea, Indonesia, the Philippines, …), there have been few international incidents. Much of the basis for the aforementioned prediction is the array of peoples, religions, economies, and lifestyles that are located in Southeast Asia. This course seeks to introduce the students to this diversity through the issues that make up the title. Southeast Asia has certain social and cultural bonds that unify the area, and these too will be analyzed in this course.

1 Course

AST 286 Landscape Art of China (ARH)

Instructor: C. Wang

Prerequisite: Determined by instructor

Offered:Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow.

This course examines the traditions of Chinese landscape representation, beginning with mountain worship in ancient China and continuing to 21st century classical Chinese garden design. We will visit China virtually and discuss the perceptions, aesthetics, cultural meanings, and connections among various types of landscape art that have been created over the past 3,000 years. Ever wonder why Chinese landscape painting looks so different from its western counterpart, or why natural landscape has been a primary theme of artistic expression in China? If you like exploring arts and cultures and wondering what on earth the artist was trying to communicate, this is the course for you! This class will incorporate class discussion, museum trip, and a hands-on project.

1 Course

CHI 101 Introduction to Chinese I

Instructor: TBA

Prerequisite:

Offered:Typically as student interest and faculty availability allow.

Introduction to Chinese as it is spoken in China today. Speaking and listening comprehension will be emphasized and the Chinese written language introduced.

Berea College Logo

 

Copyright © 2014 Berea College