Asian Studies Program

Fall Term 2007 Courses

AST 101 Introduction to Japanese I (JPN)

Instructor: Kobayashi

Introduction to Japanese as it is spoken in Japan today. Speaking and listening comprehension will be emphasized.

Also listed as:
JPN 101

AST 103 Introduction to Japanese III (JPN)

Instructor: Kobayashi

Prerequisite: AST/JPN 102 with a grade of C or higher or permission of instructor.

Continued development of Japanese speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.

Also listed as:
JPN 103

AST 122 Introduction to China (HIS)

Instructor: Robert Foster

Approved to Meet the Following General Education Requirement(s):International (Non-Western) Perspective

China has one of the foundational civilizations in human history. It gave rise to social structures, political systems, and philosophies that deeply influenced the development of East Asia. Through close reading of documents, focused analytical writing, open discussion and lecture, we will develop our own understanding of the evolution of China from its Neolithic origins to its present status as a world power.

Also listed as:
HIS 122

AST 229 Modern Imperialism (HIS)

Instructor: Rebecca Bates

Prerequisite: AST/HIS 102, 122, or 123, HIS 227, GSTR 203 or 210.
Approved to Meet the Following General Education Requirement(s):International (Non-Western) Perspective

This course is a selective exploration of imperialism using a comparative historical perspective. Beginning with a reflection on the meanings of “empire,” the course explores the rise of European empires during the “high colonialism” of the 19th and 20th centuries. This course then will explore the expansion of European colonialism and regional responses-including local resistance, national revolutions, and the development of the Soviet and Japanese Empires. After examining the dynamics of imperial decline between 1919 and 1945, the course will conclude by considering the status of empires in the post-World War II period.

Also listed as:
HIS 229

AST 231 Religions of India and Tibet (REL)

Instructor: Jeffrey L. Richey

Prerequisite: GSTR 100 or 110.
Approved to Meet the Following General Education Requirement(s):International (Non-Western) Perspective and Religion Perspective

A study of the principal religious traditions of South Asia: Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, and Sikhism. The course includes readings in the classical primary texts of each tradition, as well as attention to ritual and practice.

Also listed as:
REL 231

AST 248 Islamic Art and Architecture (ART)

Instructor: Eileen McKiernan González

Prerequisite: GSTR 203 or 210.
Approved to Meet the Following General Education Requirement(s): Arts and Religion Perspective

A study of Islamic art and architecture in the Middle East, North Africa, and Spain.

Also listed as:
ART 248

AST 323 Seminar in Japanese History: “Modern Japan: Empire, Occupation, and Identity” (HIS)

Instructor: Robert Foster

Prerequisite: AST/HIS 122 or 123 or permission of instructor.
Approved to Meet the Following General Education Requirement(s):International (Non-Western) Perspective

This course examines the transition of Japan from a semi-feudal, warrior-dominated shogunate in the early nineteenth century, to a twenty-first century constitutional monarchy. As Japan opened to the West in its desire to remain uncolonized, the Japanese were confronted with the tension between maintaining traditions and adopting Western ideas. Through the term we will use a variety of sources (literature, film, secondary historical works, etc.) to examine this issue.

Also listed as:
HIS 323

CFS 366 Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Family (WST)

Instructor: Webb

Prerequisite: SOC 100.
Approved to Meet the Following General Education Requirement(s): 
African-Americans’, Appalachians’, Women’s, and International (Non-Western) Perspective

This course entails the study of cultural influences upon family functions, structures, and behaviors, focusing on the recognition and understanding of cultural similarities and differences. Covers topics such as cross-cultural interrelationships among economy, government, religion and family; kinship systems and patterns of marital residence; cultural variations in power distribution and sex roles; differences in childrearing patterns; universal shifts from “traditional” families; and variations in roles of aging family members. Students may earn Asian Studies credit for this course provided that they complete a final project significantly related to Asian culture(s).

Also listed as:
WST 366

CHI 101 Introduction to Chinese I

Instructor: Li Yang

For more information about this course, please contact Prof. Li.

ECO 341
Economic Development: Theory and Application

Instructor: Scott Steele

Prerequisite: One introductory course in ECO, HIS, PSC, or SOC, and ECO 101 or 102.

A study of the human dimensions of societal development. The course includes theoretical approaches to economic development and social change, comparative consideration of the economic and social structural characteristics of less-developed countries, and an examination of the relationship between development policy and factors of social change. Students may earn Asian Studies credit for this course provided that they complete a final project significantly related to Asian culture(s).

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