Loyal Jones Appalachian Center

Appalachian Center Fall Semester 2009 Events

Events

12-4-2009

7:00 PM

Long Journey Home


Directed by Elizabeth Barret, 60 min. (1987)Long Journey Home explores the ethnic diversity of the Appalachian region, the economic forces causing people to migrate into and out of the area, and the choices individuals make to stay, to leave, and to come back. European immigrants recall the ethnic variety that existed in Appalachia during the first coal boom of the 1910s and 1920s. African-Americans whose families left sharecropping in the South to build the railroads and work in the mines talk about the transition to life in the coal camps, and their later dispersal across the country as automation took their jobs.

Eventually, 3.3 million people left the region in search of work. Members of these families, people with deep roots in the mountains, talk about riding the “hillbilly highway” on weekends and holidays and struggle to find a way to move back home and make a living. This film contemplates the past and future of the American economy and the toll capitalism takes on individuals, families, and communities.

11-20-2009

7:00 PM

Hazel Dickens: Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song


Directed by Mimi Pickering, 60 min. (2001)From the coalfields of West Virginia to the factories of Baltimore, Hazel Dickens has lived the songs she sings. A pioneering woman in Bluegrass and hardcore country music, Hazel has influenced generations of songwriters and musicians. Her songs of hard work, hard times, and hardy souls have bolstered working people at picket lines and union rallies throughout the land. In this intimate portrait, interviews with Hazel and fellow musicians such as Alison Krauss, Naomi Judd, and Dudley Connell are interwoven with archival footage, recent performances, and 16 powerful songs including “Mama’s Hand,” “ Working Girl Blues,” and “Black Lung.”

Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song profiles a “modern” woman dealing with contemporary issues from a feminist perspective, which has evolved from her own experiences: being Appalachian, being displaced physically and culturally, being poor and working class, being a woman artist in a man’s world, and being a bearer of tradition.

11-16-2009

3:00 – 5:00pm

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center Gallery

Reception celebrating the exhibit Miners and Mining:  Forty-Five Years of Photographs by Warren Brunner

11-10-2009


11:00-11:45 AM
1:15 – 2:00 PM

Linda Tate


Appalachian Center GalleryPower in the Blood: A Family Narrative traces Linda Tate’s journey to rediscover the Cherokee-Appalachian branch of her family and provides an unflinching examination of the poverty, discrimination, and family violence that marked their lives. In her search for the truth of her own past, Tate scoured archives, libraries, and courthouses throughout Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Illinois, and Missouri, visited numerous cemeteries, and combed through census records, marriage records, court cases, local histories, old maps, and photographs. As she began to locate distant relatives — fifth, sixth, seventh cousins, all descended from her great-great grandmother Louisiana — they gathered in kitchens and living rooms, held family reunions, and swapped stories. A past that had long been buried slowly came to light as family members shared the pieces of the family’s tale that had been passed along to them.  The project emerged from a summer Appalachian Studies workshop held at Berea College. She is the author of A Southern Weave of Women: Fiction of the Contemporary South and the editor of Conversations with Lee Smith. She taught at Shepherd University in West Virginia for fifteen years and now lives in Boulder, Colorado.  Cosponsored with Women’s Studies.

11-6-2009

7:30 PM

Robert J. Conley, Appalachian Heritage Featured Author Reading


Loyal Jones Appalachian Center GalleryRobert J. Conley is the author of The Cherokee Nation: A History, the authorized history of the Cherokee and of A Cherokee Encyclopedia, as well as over seventy other novels, poetry collections and other books.  He was born in Cushing, Oklahoma, in 1940 and is an enrolled member of the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee. He earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree in English from Midwestern University and has served as Assistant Program Manager for the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.  He currently lives in Sylva, North Carolina, and holds the Sequoyah Distinguished Professorship in Cherokee Studies at Western Carolina University.  He is married to Evelyn Conley who chairs the Indigenous Education Institute and serves on the staff of the Rural Development Leadership Project.  Featured artist, Sean Ross, strives to compose visions that tell the honest, “everyday story of the Cherokee people”, with images unfettered from the preconceived notions of the masses, showing the human-ness so often overlooked. This is in the hopes of building a greater understanding and appreciation of this great people.

10-23-2009

7:00 PM

Stranger with a Camera


Directed by Elizabeth Barret, 60 min. (2000)In 1967 Canadian filmmaker Hugh O’Connor visited the mountains of Central Appalachia to document poverty. A local landlord, who resented the presence of filmmakers on his property, shot and killed O’Connor, in part because of his anger over the media images of Appalachia that had become icons in the nation’s War on Poverty.

Filmmaker Elizabeth Barret, a native of Appalachia, uses O’Connor’s death as a lens to explore the complex relationship between those who make films to promote social change and the people whose lives are represented in such media productions. Through first-person accounts of the killing and the perspective of three decades of reflection, Stranger with a Camera leads viewers on a quest for understanding—a quest that ultimately leads Barret to examine her own role as both a maker of media and a member of the Appalachian community she portrays.

10-15-2009

36th Annual Celebration of Traditional Music

October 15-18, 2009The Celebration of Traditional Music strives to represent homemade music passed on from person to person in the Appalachian Region and the musicians who play it. Old time string band music, blues, traditional gospel singing, ballads, and acoustic instruments are featured in a family-friendly atmosphere. Berea College’s students, faculty, and staff welcome the public to enjoy this festival of roots music and dancing on our campus. Bring your instruments, feet, and voices, and enjoy the many jam sessions and opportunities to learn how to sing, play, and dance to this music. This year we are featuring many great acts including; The Horse Flies, Whitetop Mountain Band, Don Pedi, Sparky and Rhonda Rucker, John Haywood, and the Berea College Bluegrass Ensemble. For more information visit the CTM website.

10-5-2009

6:00 p.m.

Silas House reads from Eli the Good

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center Gallery

Famed Kentucky novelist Silas House will read from his just-released novel, Eli the Good. Copies will be available to purchase and to have the author sign. Deborah Payne will also be present to play music.

9-29-2009

8:30 AM

bell hooks “Answering the Call: Spirituality & Education”


Loyal Jones Appalachian Center GalleryLet us talk together about the ways in which spirituality influences education—how we teach and how we learn—celebrating the ways divine wisdom serves as a guiding force. bell hooks is Distinguished Professor in Residence in Appalachian Studies at Berea College. Born Gloria Jean Watkins in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, she has chosen the lower case pen name bell hooks, based on the names of her mother and grandmother, to emphasize the importance of the substance of her writing as opposed to who she is. She is the author of over thirty books, many of which have focused on issues of social class, race, and gender. Her latest book is titled Belonging: A Culture of Place.

9-25-2009

7:00 PM

Up The Ridge


Directed by Amelia Kirby and Nick Szuberla, 60 min. (2008)A documentary film about urban prisoners in isolated rural prisons.

Wise County, Virginia 1999: Wallens Ridge State Prison. A struggling rural coal-mining community fights for economic survival by building two super-maximum security prisons to house the state’s prisoners. Within a few months reports of human rights violations and cultural tension begin surfacing. Prisoners from urban Virginia, as well as Connecticut, New Mexico, and Washington D.C. in a state run beds for hire program, are transferred to rural Appalachia where former coalminers are now correction officers. The stakes were raised when Human Rights Watch issued a scathing report of abuse and racism in the prisons. The prisoners, prisoner families, and correction officers find themselves in a vortex of cultural and political conflict.

9-22-2009

8:30 AM                   

bell hooks “Answering the Call: Spirituality & Education”


Loyal Jones Appalachian Center GalleryLet us talk together about the ways in which spirituality influences education—how we teach and how we learn—celebrating the ways divine wisdom serves as a guiding force. bell hooks is Distinguished Professor in Residence in Appalachian Studies at Berea College. Born Gloria Jean Watkins in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, she has chosen the lower case pen name bell hooks, based on the names of her mother and grandmother, to emphasize the importance of the substance of her writing as opposed to who she is. She is the author of over thirty books, many of which have focused on issues of social class, race, and gender. Her latest book is titled Belonging: A Culture of Place.

9-7-2009

12:00 PM

Berea College Bluegrass Band

The Berea College Bluegrass Band will perform a special Labor Day concert at the Loyal Jones Appalachian Center Gallery. We welcome folks to bring their lunch and join us from noon to one and listen to some great music from some great musicians. Ashley Long a 2008 graduate and Will Haizlett a 2009 graduate will return to join the group during their performance. Please come and enjoy what is sure to be a very special event that you truly won’t want to miss.

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