Loyal Jones Appalachian Center

Standing Exhibit: “Exploring Appalachia”

Posted on by Christopher Miller

GalleryWestJan14

Title: “Exploring Appalachia”

Dates Showing: Ongoing since 2006, but constantly changing.

Description: Centered around a 12 foot square relief map of the region, this exhibit provides a nice introduction to the Appalachia for all levels.  The map is the backdrop when the Gallery is converted to a classroom, making the Gallery a great setting for teaching about the region.

GalleryEastJan14

Curators: There have been a host of curators for different components of this exhibit including, Christopher Miller, Chad Berry, Silas House, and Chris Green.  Assisted by many student Curatorial Assistants and Associates.

Location: Main Gallery, Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Stephenson Hall Ground Floor, Berea College Campus, 211 N. Main St., Berea, Kentucky.  Public Parking is available at College Square and on Main Street.

 

Posted in Current Exhibits, Exhibits | 1 Comment

test

Posted on by Webteam

Paintings by Danielle Owens (Class of  2014)

Selected pieces from this online exhibit were featured in the 2014 Senior Art Exhibition in Berea College’s Upper and Lower Traylor Art Galleries as part of recent Berea College graduate Danielle Owens’ senior art project. The Loyal Jones Appalachian Center has supported this project, and continues to support it by featuring two selected pieces in Faber Library and the entire collection of powerfully poignant paintings in this online exhibit. Read below for Danielle’s description of the project.

Artist’s Statement:

I was born and raised in the heart of Southwest Virginia to a family deep-rooted in coal. Trammel, a once thriving coal camp close to my home, is a symbol of personal heritage that is rich with music, stories and the proud individuals whose hard work fueled the country in the early 1900s. My paintings are my reflection on Trammel. I recall memories of the town as it once was; and even now, it serves as a reminder of a way of life. The older generations tell stories about this time in Appalachia, and local music recalls the struggle of miners and their families, but few people from outside the coal fields of Trammel, Virginia understand its deep history. I chose to work with watercolor because of its delicate, ethereal quality, emphasized by the fading lines and faint colors. I believe this softness evokes a sense of memory, which is often dissolved and unclear. The paper I selected has a light sepia tone which reminds me of old family photographs. Just as photographs document moments passed, my work documents a place and time in Appalachia that is quickly fading away.

 

To learn more about this project, email Danielle Owens at berealady9@gmail.com.

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Dolly Parton Pinball Technical Problem

Posted on by Christopher Miller

Update July 24, 2014: The Dolly Parton Pinball has been repaired.

The LJAC’s Dolly Parton pinball machine suffered a technical failure in March 2014.  We think it is either her heart (power supply) or her brain (main circuit board).  After a  surgery this summer, we hope Dolly will return for free play in the LJAC Gallery for Fall Semester 2014.

This link will always have the Dolly’s current status.

Image of the 1979 Dolly Parton Pinball Machine in the Appalachian Center Gallery

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Exhibit: Sarah’s Appalachia: Sevier County, Tennessee

Posted on by Christopher Miller
Sarah Carr installing her exhibition: Sarah's Appalachia: Sevier County, Tennessee

Sarah Carr installing her exhibition: Sarah’s Appalachia: Sevier County, Tennessee

Title: Sarah’s Appalachia: Sevier County, Tennessee

Dates Showing: November 21, 2013 through July 31, 2014

Description: This exhibition is a photovoice project.  Berea student Sarah Carr selected five images of places connected to her hometown, Sever County, Tennessee.  Carr’s evocative caption into her place and her perceptions of that place.

View the PDF version of Sarah’s exhibition.

Curator: Student Curator Sarah Carr, student employee of the Brushy Fork Institute

Location: LJAC Gallery, Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Stephenson Hall, Berea College, 211 N. Main Street, Berea, Kentucky

Posted in Current Exhibits, Exhibits | 1 Comment

Feature: Around the World in Appalachia

Posted on by Caroline Hughes

Iron, Steel, Copper, and Aluminum exhibit case

Growing up in rural Yancey County, North Carolina, I often took walks down to Prices Creek, which ran at the bottom of my driveway. I would sift through the silt to find Sheet Mica Specimen from the Spruce Pine Mineral District shining flecks of what my dad told me was called “mica.”I wouldreturn home with fistfuls, most pieces no larger than a small skipping stone.

A drive through the next county over, Mitchell County, may at first glance seem like justanother town surrounded by waves of Blue Ridge Mountains. But there are train tracks running parallel to the road and the tree-covered landscapechanges suddenly to the exposed rock of an open pit mine for mica and quartz. The gem-mining tourist attractions in the town of Spruce Pine are an indication that this is a mining area, but North Carolina has little coal.

Quartz from the Spruce Pine Mineral District

The Spruce Pine mining district produced quartz used in the manufacture of every computer chip in the world in 2009, according to the BBC. I have lived eighteen years in this particular region and I have passed by the open mines plenty of times. I even knew that they were mining quartz and mica, but I did not realize that many electronic manufacturers around the world depended on the wellspring of mineral resources from what I considered an obscure place. My encounter with the “Made in Appalachia” exhibit clued me in.

The “Made in Appalachia: Beyond Cabins, Crafts, and Coal” exhibit in the Loyal Jones Appalachian Center Gallery displays Spruce Pine quartz and mica specimens, along with many other well known products—ranging from carpet to copper to Little Debbie Snacks—that are, unbeknownst to many, from the Appalachian region. One has only to walk through the exhibit to see the diverse skills and stories that come together in this collection.

It is interesting to note how heavily a product will influence its locality, from the population to the name of a town. Some towns are in existence only because of the product, as seen in the aluminum production story of Alcoa, Tennessee. In some areas, the resources have named the towns, like in Saltville, Virginia.

Just as quartz has effects that reach much farther than North Carolina, so do many other Appalachian products. For example, marble quarried in north Georgia is used in such familiar national landmarks as Lincoln Memorial, which is just one of the many ways that Appalachia travels outside of itself.

Assorted Marbles, made by Marble King in West Virginia

On the flip side, Appalachia brings the outside into itself. The diversity of items produced in this region indicates an even greater diversity among the hands that produced them.Many glassmakers in West Virginia were from France and Belgium. Early salt furnaces in the 1800s typically used African American slave labor. Oak Ridge, Tennessee—the “Secret City” in Appalachia for producing nuclear material for atomic bombs during the 1940s—drew in workers, primarily women, from the immediately surrounding mountains. The Birmingham, Alabama iron factories used convicts and employed previous agricultural workers. With all of these different people, products, and skill sets, Appalachia became a cultural melting pot.

This cultural spectrum is brought to light in the “Made in Appalachia: Beyond Cabins, Crafts, and Coal” exhibit, which is part of a multi-year project of the Loyal Jones Appalachian Center to expand the general perception of the Appalachian region. The Center is engaged in diversifying the artifacts collection, the majority of which are examples of the folk culture (brooms, quilts, woodwork, etc.). Such cultural items have become the region’s logo, but a browse through “Made in Appalachia” will quickly erase that generality in the mind of a visitor. Rather than primarily consisting of isolated, wholly self-sufficient homesteads, Appalachia has a transnational character and impact. The Center is expanding its teaching collection beyond the region’s iconic objects to capture this transnational attribute so seldom associated with Appalachia. Maybe recognizing where a Coca Cola bottle, snack cake, collection of marbles, or piece of mica came from will help us see this side of Appalachia, too.

Food Products exhibit case

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Exhibit: Dolly Parton Pinball, More Than Just A Game

Posted on by Christopher Miller

STATUS: Dolly has been repaired.  We expect her to return to the gallery for free play on July 28, 2014. – Updated July 24, 2014

Image of the 1979 Dolly Parton Pinball Machine in the Appalachian Center Gallery

Title: Our Dolly Parton Pinball Machine: More Than Just a Game

Dates Showing: September 2, 2013 through the present

Description: Built around an actual, working 1979 Dolly Parton pinball machine, this exhibition explores Appalachian identity and representation. In the mid-1970s, Bally, a leading pinball machine maker, had a successful series of machines based on celebrities including singer Elton John, daredevil Evil Knievel, hockey star Bobby Orr, and the rock group KISS. Bally Executive Tom Nieman wanted a machine he could sell to country-western bars.  In 1978, Bally approached Appalachian-born country star Dolly Parton to license her persona for a pinball machine.  Parton agreed, a contract was signed, and design work began.  This began an interesting process of determining how Parton would be portrayed in the artwork on the machine.

Click here to visit the online version of the exhibit.

Curators: College Curator Christopher Miller assisted by Student Curators Jonita Horn,   Joey Shepherd, and Matt Heil.  The online version also involved Student Curatorial Assistant Caroline Hughes.

Location: LJAC Gallery, Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Stephenson Hall, Berea College, 211 N. Main Street, Berea, Kentucky

Posted in Current Exhibits, Exhibits | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Exhibit: Made in Appalachia: Exploring Appalachian Material Culture Beyond Cabins, Crafts, and Coal

Posted on by Christopher Miller

Banner for Exhibit, Made in Appalachia: Exploring Appalachian Material Culture Beyond Cabins, Crafts, and Coal

Title: Made in Appalachia: Exploring Appalachian Material Culture Beyond Cabins, Crafts, and Coal

Dates Showing: September 2, 2013 through June 30, 2015

Description: This exhibition explores Appalachian material culture beyond the artifacts stereotypically associated with the region.  It is part of a larger multi-year project  expanding and diversifying our ideas about Appalachian material culture and diversifying our Appalachian Studies Teaching Collection of Artifacts.  This exhibit uses products of the region as an entrée to expanded ideas about the region and its people, including:

  • Salt from the West Virginia salines,
  • Cast iron from eastern Kentucky,
  • Ethylene glycol anti-freeze from the Chemical Valley,
  • The Kodak film emulsion and acetate substrate,
  • The acetate fibers and fabrics used in women’s clothing,
  • Glass marbles, bottles, and volume production art glass,
  • Mass produced restaurant and hotel china,
  • Kodel polyester fabrics,
  • Early Tenite plastic housewares,
  • Aluminum siding, housewares, and beverage cans,
  • Uranium and plutonium for the first atomic bombs,
  • Carpet and tufted bedspreads from north Georgia,
  • Bottled Coca Cola
  • Manufacture of soda bottles and crates,
  • and dozens of other items.

In the exhibit you can see these items and read the stories of their connection to Appalachia.  Exploring this array of artifacts helps open up our ideas about who has lived and worked in Appalachia.  One encounters slaves who worked in the salt and iron furnaces, Flemish and French immigrants glass workers, freed African-Americans who provided the “cheap labor” in steel mills, Eastern European factory workers, child labor, migrants from rural Appalachian and the Deep South, and the “Hillbilly Girls” who made uranium for the first atomic bombs.

Click here to visit the online version of the exhibit.

Curators: College Curator Christopher Miller and Student Curatorial Associate Joey Shepherd.  The online version also involved Student Curatorial Assistant Caroline Hughes.  The project registrar was Student Curatorial Associate Matt Heil.

Location: Appalachian Center Gallery Display Cases, Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Stephenson Hall, Berea College, 211 N. Main Street, Berea, Kentucky

Display Case Number 5 in the Appalachian Center Gallery showing artifacts from the chemical and plastic industry in Appalachia

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Past Exhibit: All the Pretty Horses

Posted on by Christopher Miller
Painting of a horse by Peter Josyph

One of Peter Josyph’s horses.

 

Title: All the Pretty Horses: Works on Paper by Peter Josyph Celebrating Cormac McCarthy’s Novel

Dates Shown: March 8, 2013 through May 31, 2013

Description: An exhibition of ten works on paper by New York artist Peter Josyph. Josyph drew his inspiration from Cormac McCarthy’s novel All they Pretty Horses. The exhibition opened during the 2013 International Cormac McCarthy Conference, held in Berea, Kentucky.

Curators: Artist Peter Josyph with interpretive elements by Christopher Miller.

Location: Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Stephenson Hall, Berea College, 205 N. Main Street, Berea, Kentucky

Links:

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Exhibit: 40 Years of Appalachian Heritage Magazine

Posted on by Christopher Miller


Title: “40 Years of Appalachian Heritage: A Literary Quarterly of the Southern Appalachians”

Dates Showing: June 7, 2013 through February 15, 2014

Description: This show explores the impact of one of the region’s first and most significant regional journals after forty years of publication.

Curators: Former Editor George Brosi, LJAC Director Chris Green, Student Curatorial Associate Joey Shephard, and College Curator Christopher Miller.

Location:  Longwall Gallery, Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Bruce-Trades Building, Berea College, 205 N. Main Street, Berea, Kentucky

Online Version: A limited online version of the exhibit is available.

 

Posted in Current Exhibits, Exhibits | Tagged | Leave a comment

LJAC’s Winter 2013 Newsletter is released

Posted on by Webteam

Please visit our Newsletter page to see the latest issue.

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A Community Writers Workshop on Non-Fiction with Rachael Peckham

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April 18, 2013

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, 6:00-8:00. Co-sponsored with the English Program.

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Dr. Amy Clark on Talking Appalachian: Voice, Identity and Community, a book about Appalachian dialects.”

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April 16, 2013

A Loyal Jones Appalachian Center Dinner on the Grounds from 11:45 – 1:00.

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“Kentucky: What Holds Us & Hurts Us,” a panel with bell hooks, Silas House, Vicky Hayes, and Landra Lewis

Posted on by Webteam

TBD

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center 6:00 – 8:00.

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bell hooks on her book Beyond Race

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April 8, 2013

A Loyal Jones Appalachian Center Dinner on the Grounds from 11:45 – 1:00.

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Appalachian Heritage celebrates its 40th Anniversary Issue with Gurney Norman, Silas House, and Crystal Wilkinson

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April 5, 2013

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, 7:30 – 9:30.

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Ron Rash, “Tell the Truth, but Tell it Slant: The Past as Present in Appalachia,”

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April 4, 2013

Berea’s Convocation Appalachian Lecture, 3:00 – 4:00, Phelps-Stokes Auditorium

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A Community Writers Workshop on Comics and Graphic Narratives with Arwen Donahue

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March 19, 2013

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, 6:00-8:00, Co-sponsored with the English Program

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Cormac McCarthy Society, All the Pretty Horses 20th Anniversary Conference

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March 6-9, 2013

Co-Sponsored with Appalachian Heritage. Baird Lounge in Alumni Hall.

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A Community Writers Workshop on Fiction with Silas House: Feb. 28, 2013

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February 28, 2013

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, 6:00-8:00. Co-sponsored with the English Program.

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Community Connections with the Frontier Nursing University

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February 28, 2013

Light lunch provided.  Co-sponsored with CELTS, Nursing, and CTL.  11:45 – 1:00.

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Saro Lynch-Thomason on the Blair Pathways Music Project and the Fight to Save Blair Mountain from MTR

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February 27, 2013

A Loyal Jones Appalachian Center Dinner on the Grounds from 11:45 – 1:00.

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A Community Writers Workshop on Poetry with Lynell Edwards

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February 5, 2013

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, 6:00-8:00. Co-sponsored with the English Program.

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Mass Incarceration Central Appalachia Prisoner Support Network.

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January 23, 2013

A Dinner on the Grounds from 11:45-1:00. Co-sponsored with the Campus Christian Center, the Carter G. Woodson Center for Interracial Education, and Women’s and Gender Studies.

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Master Classes in Writing: Fiction

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3-6-2012
6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

Master Classes in Writing: Fiction
Appalachian Center GalleryAmy Green is our second guest instructor in the MASTER CLASSES IN WRITING and will focus on FICTION.

March 6, 6-8pm in the gallery of the Loyal Jones Appalachian Center

Bring pens, paper, or laptop (battery-operated only, no outlets provided)

This event is free and open to EVERYONE.

http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2010/jan/10/storybook-success/

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Standing Exhibit: “Exploring Appalachia”

GalleryWestJan14

Title: “Exploring Appalachia”

Dates Showing: Ongoing since 2006, but constantly changing.

Description: Centered around a 12 foot square relief map of the region, this exhibit provides a nice introduction to the Appalachia for all levels.  The map is the backdrop when the Gallery is converted to a classroom, making the Gallery a great setting for teaching about the region.

GalleryEastJan14

Curators: There have been a host of curators for different components of this exhibit including, Christopher Miller, Chad Berry, Silas House, and Chris Green.  Assisted by many student Curatorial Assistants and Associates.

Location: Main Gallery, Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Stephenson Hall Ground Floor, Berea College Campus, 211 N. Main St., Berea, Kentucky.  Public Parking is available at College Square and on Main Street.

 

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Paintings by Danielle Owens (Class of  2014)

Selected pieces from this online exhibit were featured in the 2014 Senior Art Exhibition in Berea College’s Upper and Lower Traylor Art Galleries as part of recent Berea College graduate Danielle Owens’ senior art project. The Loyal Jones Appalachian Center has supported this project, and continues to support it by featuring two selected pieces in Faber Library and the entire collection of powerfully poignant paintings in this online exhibit. Read below for Danielle’s description of the project.

Artist’s Statement:

I was born and raised in the heart of Southwest Virginia to a family deep-rooted in coal. Trammel, a once thriving coal camp close to my home, is a symbol of personal heritage that is rich with music, stories and the proud individuals whose hard work fueled the country in the early 1900s. My paintings are my reflection on Trammel. I recall memories of the town as it once was; and even now, it serves as a reminder of a way of life. The older generations tell stories about this time in Appalachia, and local music recalls the struggle of miners and their families, but few people from outside the coal fields of Trammel, Virginia understand its deep history. I chose to work with watercolor because of its delicate, ethereal quality, emphasized by the fading lines and faint colors. I believe this softness evokes a sense of memory, which is often dissolved and unclear. The paper I selected has a light sepia tone which reminds me of old family photographs. Just as photographs document moments passed, my work documents a place and time in Appalachia that is quickly fading away.

 

To learn more about this project, email Danielle Owens at berealady9@gmail.com.

Dolly Parton Pinball Technical Problem

Update July 24, 2014: The Dolly Parton Pinball has been repaired.

The LJAC’s Dolly Parton pinball machine suffered a technical failure in March 2014.  We think it is either her heart (power supply) or her brain (main circuit board).  After a  surgery this summer, we hope Dolly will return for free play in the LJAC Gallery for Fall Semester 2014.

This link will always have the Dolly’s current status.

Image of the 1979 Dolly Parton Pinball Machine in the Appalachian Center Gallery

Exhibit: Sarah’s Appalachia: Sevier County, Tennessee

Sarah Carr installing her exhibition: Sarah's Appalachia: Sevier County, Tennessee

Sarah Carr installing her exhibition: Sarah’s Appalachia: Sevier County, Tennessee

Title: Sarah’s Appalachia: Sevier County, Tennessee

Dates Showing: November 21, 2013 through July 31, 2014

Description: This exhibition is a photovoice project.  Berea student Sarah Carr selected five images of places connected to her hometown, Sever County, Tennessee.  Carr’s evocative caption into her place and her perceptions of that place.

View the PDF version of Sarah’s exhibition.

Curator: Student Curator Sarah Carr, student employee of the Brushy Fork Institute

Location: LJAC Gallery, Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Stephenson Hall, Berea College, 211 N. Main Street, Berea, Kentucky

Feature: Around the World in Appalachia

Iron, Steel, Copper, and Aluminum exhibit case

Growing up in rural Yancey County, North Carolina, I often took walks down to Prices Creek, which ran at the bottom of my driveway. I would sift through the silt to find Sheet Mica Specimen from the Spruce Pine Mineral District shining flecks of what my dad told me was called “mica.”I wouldreturn home with fistfuls, most pieces no larger than a small skipping stone.

A drive through the next county over, Mitchell County, may at first glance seem like justanother town surrounded by waves of Blue Ridge Mountains. But there are train tracks running parallel to the road and the tree-covered landscapechanges suddenly to the exposed rock of an open pit mine for mica and quartz. The gem-mining tourist attractions in the town of Spruce Pine are an indication that this is a mining area, but North Carolina has little coal.

Quartz from the Spruce Pine Mineral District

The Spruce Pine mining district produced quartz used in the manufacture of every computer chip in the world in 2009, according to the BBC. I have lived eighteen years in this particular region and I have passed by the open mines plenty of times. I even knew that they were mining quartz and mica, but I did not realize that many electronic manufacturers around the world depended on the wellspring of mineral resources from what I considered an obscure place. My encounter with the “Made in Appalachia” exhibit clued me in.

The “Made in Appalachia: Beyond Cabins, Crafts, and Coal” exhibit in the Loyal Jones Appalachian Center Gallery displays Spruce Pine quartz and mica specimens, along with many other well known products—ranging from carpet to copper to Little Debbie Snacks—that are, unbeknownst to many, from the Appalachian region. One has only to walk through the exhibit to see the diverse skills and stories that come together in this collection.

It is interesting to note how heavily a product will influence its locality, from the population to the name of a town. Some towns are in existence only because of the product, as seen in the aluminum production story of Alcoa, Tennessee. In some areas, the resources have named the towns, like in Saltville, Virginia.

Just as quartz has effects that reach much farther than North Carolina, so do many other Appalachian products. For example, marble quarried in north Georgia is used in such familiar national landmarks as Lincoln Memorial, which is just one of the many ways that Appalachia travels outside of itself.

Assorted Marbles, made by Marble King in West Virginia

On the flip side, Appalachia brings the outside into itself. The diversity of items produced in this region indicates an even greater diversity among the hands that produced them.Many glassmakers in West Virginia were from France and Belgium. Early salt furnaces in the 1800s typically used African American slave labor. Oak Ridge, Tennessee—the “Secret City” in Appalachia for producing nuclear material for atomic bombs during the 1940s—drew in workers, primarily women, from the immediately surrounding mountains. The Birmingham, Alabama iron factories used convicts and employed previous agricultural workers. With all of these different people, products, and skill sets, Appalachia became a cultural melting pot.

This cultural spectrum is brought to light in the “Made in Appalachia: Beyond Cabins, Crafts, and Coal” exhibit, which is part of a multi-year project of the Loyal Jones Appalachian Center to expand the general perception of the Appalachian region. The Center is engaged in diversifying the artifacts collection, the majority of which are examples of the folk culture (brooms, quilts, woodwork, etc.). Such cultural items have become the region’s logo, but a browse through “Made in Appalachia” will quickly erase that generality in the mind of a visitor. Rather than primarily consisting of isolated, wholly self-sufficient homesteads, Appalachia has a transnational character and impact. The Center is expanding its teaching collection beyond the region’s iconic objects to capture this transnational attribute so seldom associated with Appalachia. Maybe recognizing where a Coca Cola bottle, snack cake, collection of marbles, or piece of mica came from will help us see this side of Appalachia, too.

Food Products exhibit case

Exhibit: Dolly Parton Pinball, More Than Just A Game

STATUS: Dolly has been repaired.  We expect her to return to the gallery for free play on July 28, 2014. – Updated July 24, 2014

Image of the 1979 Dolly Parton Pinball Machine in the Appalachian Center Gallery

Title: Our Dolly Parton Pinball Machine: More Than Just a Game

Dates Showing: September 2, 2013 through the present

Description: Built around an actual, working 1979 Dolly Parton pinball machine, this exhibition explores Appalachian identity and representation. In the mid-1970s, Bally, a leading pinball machine maker, had a successful series of machines based on celebrities including singer Elton John, daredevil Evil Knievel, hockey star Bobby Orr, and the rock group KISS. Bally Executive Tom Nieman wanted a machine he could sell to country-western bars.  In 1978, Bally approached Appalachian-born country star Dolly Parton to license her persona for a pinball machine.  Parton agreed, a contract was signed, and design work began.  This began an interesting process of determining how Parton would be portrayed in the artwork on the machine.

Click here to visit the online version of the exhibit.

Curators: College Curator Christopher Miller assisted by Student Curators Jonita Horn,   Joey Shepherd, and Matt Heil.  The online version also involved Student Curatorial Assistant Caroline Hughes.

Location: LJAC Gallery, Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Stephenson Hall, Berea College, 211 N. Main Street, Berea, Kentucky

Exhibit: Made in Appalachia: Exploring Appalachian Material Culture Beyond Cabins, Crafts, and Coal

Banner for Exhibit, Made in Appalachia: Exploring Appalachian Material Culture Beyond Cabins, Crafts, and Coal

Title: Made in Appalachia: Exploring Appalachian Material Culture Beyond Cabins, Crafts, and Coal

Dates Showing: September 2, 2013 through June 30, 2015

Description: This exhibition explores Appalachian material culture beyond the artifacts stereotypically associated with the region.  It is part of a larger multi-year project  expanding and diversifying our ideas about Appalachian material culture and diversifying our Appalachian Studies Teaching Collection of Artifacts.  This exhibit uses products of the region as an entrée to expanded ideas about the region and its people, including:

  • Salt from the West Virginia salines,
  • Cast iron from eastern Kentucky,
  • Ethylene glycol anti-freeze from the Chemical Valley,
  • The Kodak film emulsion and acetate substrate,
  • The acetate fibers and fabrics used in women’s clothing,
  • Glass marbles, bottles, and volume production art glass,
  • Mass produced restaurant and hotel china,
  • Kodel polyester fabrics,
  • Early Tenite plastic housewares,
  • Aluminum siding, housewares, and beverage cans,
  • Uranium and plutonium for the first atomic bombs,
  • Carpet and tufted bedspreads from north Georgia,
  • Bottled Coca Cola
  • Manufacture of soda bottles and crates,
  • and dozens of other items.

In the exhibit you can see these items and read the stories of their connection to Appalachia.  Exploring this array of artifacts helps open up our ideas about who has lived and worked in Appalachia.  One encounters slaves who worked in the salt and iron furnaces, Flemish and French immigrants glass workers, freed African-Americans who provided the “cheap labor” in steel mills, Eastern European factory workers, child labor, migrants from rural Appalachian and the Deep South, and the “Hillbilly Girls” who made uranium for the first atomic bombs.

Click here to visit the online version of the exhibit.

Curators: College Curator Christopher Miller and Student Curatorial Associate Joey Shepherd.  The online version also involved Student Curatorial Assistant Caroline Hughes.  The project registrar was Student Curatorial Associate Matt Heil.

Location: Appalachian Center Gallery Display Cases, Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Stephenson Hall, Berea College, 211 N. Main Street, Berea, Kentucky

Display Case Number 5 in the Appalachian Center Gallery showing artifacts from the chemical and plastic industry in Appalachia

Past Exhibit: All the Pretty Horses

Painting of a horse by Peter Josyph

One of Peter Josyph’s horses.

 

Title: All the Pretty Horses: Works on Paper by Peter Josyph Celebrating Cormac McCarthy’s Novel

Dates Shown: March 8, 2013 through May 31, 2013

Description: An exhibition of ten works on paper by New York artist Peter Josyph. Josyph drew his inspiration from Cormac McCarthy’s novel All they Pretty Horses. The exhibition opened during the 2013 International Cormac McCarthy Conference, held in Berea, Kentucky.

Curators: Artist Peter Josyph with interpretive elements by Christopher Miller.

Location: Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Stephenson Hall, Berea College, 205 N. Main Street, Berea, Kentucky

Links:

Exhibit: 40 Years of Appalachian Heritage Magazine


Title: “40 Years of Appalachian Heritage: A Literary Quarterly of the Southern Appalachians”

Dates Showing: June 7, 2013 through February 15, 2014

Description: This show explores the impact of one of the region’s first and most significant regional journals after forty years of publication.

Curators: Former Editor George Brosi, LJAC Director Chris Green, Student Curatorial Associate Joey Shephard, and College Curator Christopher Miller.

Location:  Longwall Gallery, Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, Bruce-Trades Building, Berea College, 205 N. Main Street, Berea, Kentucky

Online Version: A limited online version of the exhibit is available.

 

LJAC’s Winter 2013 Newsletter is released

Please visit our Newsletter page to see the latest issue.

A Community Writers Workshop on Non-Fiction with Rachael Peckham

April 18, 2013

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, 6:00-8:00. Co-sponsored with the English Program.

Dr. Amy Clark on Talking Appalachian: Voice, Identity and Community, a book about Appalachian dialects.”

April 16, 2013

A Loyal Jones Appalachian Center Dinner on the Grounds from 11:45 – 1:00.

“Kentucky: What Holds Us & Hurts Us,” a panel with bell hooks, Silas House, Vicky Hayes, and Landra Lewis

TBD

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center 6:00 – 8:00.

bell hooks on her book Beyond Race

April 8, 2013

A Loyal Jones Appalachian Center Dinner on the Grounds from 11:45 – 1:00.

Appalachian Heritage celebrates its 40th Anniversary Issue with Gurney Norman, Silas House, and Crystal Wilkinson

April 5, 2013

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, 7:30 – 9:30.

Ron Rash, “Tell the Truth, but Tell it Slant: The Past as Present in Appalachia,”

April 4, 2013

Berea’s Convocation Appalachian Lecture, 3:00 – 4:00, Phelps-Stokes Auditorium

A Community Writers Workshop on Comics and Graphic Narratives with Arwen Donahue

March 19, 2013

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, 6:00-8:00, Co-sponsored with the English Program

Cormac McCarthy Society, All the Pretty Horses 20th Anniversary Conference

March 6-9, 2013

Co-Sponsored with Appalachian Heritage. Baird Lounge in Alumni Hall.

A Community Writers Workshop on Fiction with Silas House: Feb. 28, 2013

February 28, 2013

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, 6:00-8:00. Co-sponsored with the English Program.

Community Connections with the Frontier Nursing University

February 28, 2013

Light lunch provided.  Co-sponsored with CELTS, Nursing, and CTL.  11:45 – 1:00.

Saro Lynch-Thomason on the Blair Pathways Music Project and the Fight to Save Blair Mountain from MTR

February 27, 2013

A Loyal Jones Appalachian Center Dinner on the Grounds from 11:45 – 1:00.

A Community Writers Workshop on Poetry with Lynell Edwards

February 5, 2013

Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, 6:00-8:00. Co-sponsored with the English Program.

Mass Incarceration Central Appalachia Prisoner Support Network.

January 23, 2013

A Dinner on the Grounds from 11:45-1:00. Co-sponsored with the Campus Christian Center, the Carter G. Woodson Center for Interracial Education, and Women’s and Gender Studies.

Master Classes in Writing: Fiction

3-6-2012
6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

Master Classes in Writing: Fiction
Appalachian Center GalleryAmy Green is our second guest instructor in the MASTER CLASSES IN WRITING and will focus on FICTION.

March 6, 6-8pm in the gallery of the Loyal Jones Appalachian Center

Bring pens, paper, or laptop (battery-operated only, no outlets provided)

This event is free and open to EVERYONE.

http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2010/jan/10/storybook-success/

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